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All Course Descriptions

All Disciplines

ACC 121 (4-0-4) - Financial Accounting

This course introduces current procedures of financial accounting and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The course emphasizes the analysis of business transactions and the study of the accounting cycle. Topical areas in the course include accrual-based accounting concepts, internal controls; financial statement preparation; and accounting elements of a corporate business entity. An Excel-based software is utilized to practice and complete many of the problems. Ethical accounting standards are embedded throughout the course materials.

ACC 122 (4-0-4) - Managerial Accounting

This course introduces current managerial accounting  concepts, theories and practices applicable to manufacturing, retail and service industries. Job order, process cost and activity-based cost systems are introduced. Topics include budgeting, profit analysis, product pricing and reporting concerns of decentralized operations. Students utilize an Excel-based software system to practice and complete many of the problems. Ethical issues are discussed throughout the course. 
PR: ACC 121 

ACC 205 (3-0-3) - Computer Applications in Accounting

This course provides a hands-on introduction to computerized accounting principles using Excel and QuickBooks. It also presents knowledge on how to set up a business entity’s accounting system. Topics include recording financial transactions in a journal, developing financial statements and reports, creating and analyzing accounts receivable and accounts payable aging reports, creating invoices, recording adjusting entries, developing budgets, developing a payroll schedule and recording payroll tax journal entries, creating depreciation schedules for fixed assets, analyzing bond interest, and conducting a present value analysis.

ACC 222 (3-0-3) - Intermediate Accounting I

This course gives intensive consideration to financial accounting theory and the current application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). A significant amount of time is devoted to financial statement preparation and presentation. Emphasis is placed on the balance sheet and its various accounts. Topics covered include the accounting cycle, measurement of income, acquisition and disposal of assets, and the time value of money. 
PR: ACC 122 Fall only 

ACC 225 (3-0-3) - Income Tax Accounting

This course introduces the current income tax law and tax regulations for individuals and certain business entities. Specific tax situations are presented and analyzed in accordance with the taxation rules set forth by the Internal Revenue Code and other primary tax sources such as case law. Topics include an examination of what constitutes income, acceptable deductions, analysis of property transactions, alternative minimum taxation, and recent legislation. Individual tax forms are prepared. 

ACC 226 (4-0-4) - Intermediate Accounting II

This course is a continuation of the study of financial accounting theory and practice. Specific accounts are examined including current and contingent liabilities, bonds, notes, corporate income taxes, leases, capital stock, pensions, and retaining earnings. Preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are also covered. Financial statement analysis, revenue recognition rules, and accounting changes, and other topics are addressed. Excel- based web software systems re utilized in and outside of the classroom to complete assignments. 
PR: ACC 222 Spring only 

ACC 240 (3-0-3) - Internal Auditing

This introductory internal auditing course examines the fundamental internal audit concepts followed by an illustration of how to conduct internal audit engagements. Topics covered include an examination of governance concepts, risk management, internal control the procedures used by internal auditors, the assurance engagement, methods used to communicate the results, and procedures for following up. The course examines internal auditing within a computerized environment.

ACC 250 (0-9-3) - Accounting Internship

This course provides an opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to accounting. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced while working in a supervised professional setting. The field study will incorporate accounting or accounting related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by scheduled meetings with the instructor. The course requires the completion of 120 hours of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. 
PR: Accounting or Business major, completion of 30 credit hours, completion of ACC 122, minimum overall GPA of 2.5, and permission of the Division.

ATC 101 (0-3-1) - Flight for Controllers

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to integrate flight and air traffic control sequences. This primary flight training includes dual instruction only in basic flight maneuvers, air traffic control procedures at controlled and uncontrolled airports, introduction to cross country procedures and air traffic control at terminal and enroute facilities. Students are introduced to navigational facilities and procedures including traffic sequencing takeoff and approach at normal and high density airports. 
PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 103 Fall Only

ATC 110 (3-0-3) - Air Traffic Basics

This course covers the knowledge areas for a Control Tower Operator Certificate. Subjects covered in this course include: a review of the Air Traffic Control (ATC) System and the National Airspace System, aircraft separation minima requirements, fundamentals of radar, introduction to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) orders and manuals (7110 manual), Letters of Agreement, Search and Rescue Operations, Pilot/Controller Glossary and mandatory phraseology, stripmarking and clearance requirements. Students will be required to complete the FAA Control Tower Operator’s Exam in order to continue in subsequent ATC program laboratories. 
PR: AER 103 and AER 101 or ATC 101

ATC 141 (0-3-1) - Instrument for Controllers

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to integrate instrument flight and instrument air traffic control sequences. This flight training includes dual instruction in attitude instrument flying, instrument navigation, air traffic control system and clearances, departure and enroute charts and procedures, holding, approach charts and procedures and IFR cross country navigation. Must enroll concurrently with AER 140. 
PR: ATC 141 or AER 101

ATC 200 (3-0-3) - Ground Control

This course covers the required knowledge for ground and clearance delivery controllers. Students will learn aircraft recognition features and performance material, airport utilization and console instruments specific to ground control and clearance delivery. Students will be exposed to and determine best course of action procedures for handling emergency and unusual situations as a function of the ground control position. 
PR: ATC 110 CR: ATC 205 Fall only

ATC 205 (0-6-2) - Ground Control Laboratory

This course is an application of the knowledge information gained in ATC 110 and ATC 200 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during ground operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of ground control and clearance delivery operators and hands-on, over-the- shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during taxi, clearance and ground operations. 
PR: ATC 110 and FAA Second Class Medical Certificate CR: ATC 200; Lab Fee: $2,000 Fall only

ATC 250 (3-0-3) - Local Control

This course covers the required knowledge for local tower controllers. Students will learn VFR and IFR separation rules and apply rules to separating departing and arriving aircraft in visual and instrumental conditions, VFR on-top and special VFR conditions. Students will learn helicopter and special flight operations for numerous aircraft types and configurations. Students will apply weather theory and instrumentation to the various effects on inflight aircraft including LLWSAS, runway condition advisories and hazardous weather advisories. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary radar tower equipment. 
PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 255 Spring only

ATC 255 (0-6-2) - Local Control Laboratory

This course is an application of the knowledge gained in ATC 250 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during flight operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of flight control operators and hands-on, over- the-shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during VFR and IFR departure and arrival operations. Upon completion of this laboratory, students will have gained the experience to complete a Control Tower Operator-Facility Rating at the Schenectady County Airport. 
PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 250; Lab Fee: $2,500 Spring only

ATC 260 (2-0-2) - Enroute Control

This course is a study of the required knowledge for Enroute Control Operations. Students will be introduced to subject areas involving a career in the FAA as an air traffic controller. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, airway facilities, role of the air traffic controller, locations and office facilities. Students will gain insight into entry level positions within the FAA and training at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, OK. Students will be exposed to primary and secondary radar control operations including DBRITE radar indicator tower equipment. Students will gain strategies for satisfactorily completing the FAA entrance exam (Air Traffic Selection and Training AT-SAT test). 
PR: ATC 200 CR: ATC 250 Spring only

ATC 280 (1-6-3) - Aviation/ATC Internship

This course provides a student with the opportunity to explore and gain experience working in an aviation or air traffic control related career. Classroom theory and laboratory experiences, were applicable, are enhanced while working under the supervision of a professional in the industry. Field study will incorporate aviation or air traffic control related assignments and will require scheduled meetings with the instructor. Completion of 90 hours of fieldwork is required and grading is on a pass/fail basis. Students must apply for and receive Instructor or Dean approval to enroll in this course.

ASL 121 (3-0-3) - Elementary American Sign Language I

As the first half of the one-year sequence in elementary American Sign Language (ASL), this course introduces students to the processes and structure of the language and provides the basic skills necessary to use the language. Students’ expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by an understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice is required to be completed in the college’s Language Lab. The course is designed for beginners.

ASL 122 (3-0-3) - Elementary American Sign Language II

As the second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary American Sign Language (ASL), this course continues the study of the processes and basic structures of ASL to provide higher level skills to use the language more fluently. Students’ expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by a deeper understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice is required to be completed in the college’s Language Lab. 
PR: ASL 121

ART 127 (2-2-3) - Introduction to Watercolors

This foundational painting course includes segments of both lecture-demonstration and laboratory. Lectures include topics on the history of watercolors and its relationship to the history of art. Sessions facilitate the student’s exploration of fundamentals such as observation, composition, color theory, the basic techniques in watercolor, as well as working from still life, landscape, the figure, and music. The course demonstrates and incorporates design fundamentals, and personal expression is strongly encouraged.

ART 128 (2-2-3) - Introduction to Drawing

This course includes segments of lecture, demonstration, and laboratory. It includes lectures on the history of drawing and its relationship to the history of art. It facilitates student development of basic drawing techniques through the exploration of fundamentals such as observation, composition, color theory, perspective, as well as working from still life, landscape, the figure, and music. The course incorporates the demonstration of design fundamentals on a weekly basis. It strongly encourages personal expression.

ART 129 (2-2-3) - Two-Dimensional Design

This foundation course introduces students to the basic theory and practice of two-dimensional design. It emphasizes an understanding of two-dimensional design concepts and explores the elements and value of concept, image, expression, visual problem solving, and studio practice. 
PR: ART 127 or 128 or evidence of studio art in high school

ART 133 (3-0-3) - History of Art I

This course introduces the students to the history of art in the western tradition from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. It focuses on communication through the visual forms of painting, sculpture and architecture. Additionally, it provides students the opportunity to identify and analyze examples of media, forms, and content in relation to various cultures and periods.

ART 135 (3-0-3) - History of Art II

This course introduces the history of art in the western tradition from the Italian Renaissance to the 20th century. It demonstrates how painting, sculpture, and architecture communicate through visual form. It provides students the opportunity to identify and analyze examples of media, forms and content in relation to various cultures and periods.

ART 150 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Film and Culture

This course explores film as a critical social mirror within a selected cultural context. The course examines artistic elements such as narrative, cinematography, direction, acting, and mise-en-scene, and focuses on the socio-cultural and historical factors that shape cinema such as political and religious ideologies, class, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, and physical ability.

AST 123 (3-0-3) - Exploring Space

This course examines present and future methods of space exploration. Topics include the basic science, instruments, technology, dangers, benefits, costs, and practical and political importance of space exploration. Discussion topics include space stations, moon colonies, manned missions from Mercury through Apollo, and current international space missions. Spring only 

AST 125 (3-0-3) - Solar System

This course introduces students to the modern exploration of the solar system. Topics include the evolution and characteristics of the major planets, moons, and numerous minor planets of the solar system. Other topics include solar and lunar eclipses, seasons, lunar phases and astronomical folklore, and comparisons to recently discovered planetary systems. Fall only 

AST 127 (3-0-3) - Cosmic System

This course introduces students to the scientific study of the cosmic system. Emphasis is placed on the evolution, life-cycle, and characteristics of the stars and galaxies. Information from recent discoveries by the space-based telescope and other 21st century telescopes is presented. Other topics include constellation identification, life in the universe, and current theories of cosmology. Spring only

AER 101 (0-3-1) - Introduction to Flight Laboratory

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire a Private Pilot’s license, Aircraft, SEL certificate. The primary flight training includes dual and solo flight time to meet the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) practical testing standards in such training as basic flight maneuvers, takeoff and landing, night flying and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. 
PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate Recommended, Homeland Security Administration Background Requirements. Students must be eligible for ENG 123 and 100-level Math course. PR/CR: AER 103 Lab Fee: $12364. Fall only

AER 102 (3-0-3) - Aviation History

This course provides a general description of the entire field of aviation starting with the early achievements of flight and progressing through the various milestones to the present age. This course contains an overview of the governmental involvement with the aviation industry from establishing the postal routes, safety regulation, airline subsidies, through deregulation of the airline industry. This course includes the contributions to aviation by women, minorities and other cultures. The introduction and development of power flight, from Zeppelins, Flying Boats, through the Boeing 777, and the X-30 Oriental Express and beyond is also explored. An extended field trip will be made to either the Curtis Air Museum in Hammondsport, N.Y. or the Rhinebeck Aerodrome, Rhinebeck, N.Y., to see aircraft from the early years of flight. Fall only

AER 103 (4-0-4) - Introduction to Flight

This course provides a student with the fundamental concepts necessary to successfully complete the FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Exam. Subject areas included in this course are: theory of flight, basic aerodynamics principles, single-engine land airplane, operation/systems/performance, navigation, flight computer computations, communications, publications, regulations and basic emergency procedures. Fall only 
PR: Students must be eligible to enroll in ENG 123 and a 100-level Math course

AER 140 (4-0-4) - Elements of Instrument

This course is a study of the instrument flying techniques and procedures in conjunction with modern, ILS, VOR, ADF, GPS and radar facilities. The course includes the study of basic attitude instrument flying, instrument navigation procedures, holding, precision and non-precision departure, en route and arrival procedures, macro and micro-meteorology analysis, aircraft performance and decision making strategies for the instrument flight environment. Students are provided with the information necessary to complete the FAA Instrument Rating Knowledge Exam, although not a requirement for course completion. Students should be aware that achieving a 70% or higher on the FAA Knowledge Exam is required in order to achieve an FAA Instrument Rating. 
PR: AER 103, or equivalent; or a Private Pilot’s License

AER 141 (0-3-1) - Elements of Instrument Flight Lab

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft and an approved flight training device to acquire flight time necessary toward an Instrument Rating, Aircraft, SEL. The primary instrument flight training includes dual flight time to meet the FAA airmen certification standards in such training as attitude instrument flying, departure, en route and approach procedures in the instrument flight environment, navigation systems, holding and emergency operations, instrument night flying and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet airmen certification standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended); proof of US citizenship or of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. 
PR: AER 103 and AER 101, or equivalent Private Pilot’s License CR: AER 140 Elements of Instrument

AER 150 (3-0-3) - Airport Operations, Safety and Security

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport’s various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations. Fall only

AER 200 (3-0-3) - Commercial Operations

This course is a study of the required knowledge for a Commercial Pilot’s license. Subjects covered in this course include: advanced aerodynamics, advanced aircraft systems, physiology, emergency procedures and planning, flight safety, and aeronautical decision making. There is a focus on crew resource management and flight safety operations to include Part 91 and Part 135 regulations and operations. Students will receive an instructor endorsement for the Commercial Pilot Knowledge Exam at the completion of the course requirements for an airplane-SEL. 
PR: AER 103 or equivalent Fall only

AER 210 (3-0-3) - Aviation Law

This course covers the history of aviation law, federal regulation of air transportation with special attention to ecological aspects of aircraft noise and pollutants and the role of state and federal government in aviation law, including functions of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Terminal Security Administration. 
PR: AER 103 or permission of the department Spring only

AER 214 (3-0-3) - Physiology of Flight

In this course students will study the physical effects of flight on the human body including a discussion of the following: cockpit resource management, effects of high altitude flight, G-forces, alcohol and drugs, including OTC and illicit, IMSAFE requirement of every pilot for the safety of themselves as well as other persons, passengers and property, and FAR Part 37 Medical disqualifications. 
PR: AER 103 or permission of the department Spring only

AER 228 (0-3-1) - Commercial Operations Lab I

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft toward the FAA cross-country requirement to obtain a Commercial Pilot Certificate. This course alone will not complete all requirements for the commercial certificate. Students will gain flight experience in day and night cross-country both dual and solo. Students will be introduced to the crew resource management concept, function and practical use of standard operating procedures, minimum equipment lists and commercial flight operations (Part 135 and Part 121) scenarios. 
PR: AER 140 and AER 141 or equivalent, Private Pilot with an Instrument Rating, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements.
CR: AER 200 or equivalent Lab Fee : $6,700 Fall only

AER 229 (0-3-1) - Commercial Operations Lab II

This course provides a student with continued practical experience in crew resource management as it applies to complex and high performance aircraft. Continued use of effective communication skills are formulated and evaluated throughout this course. Students are introduced to the function and operation of advanced aircraft systems, practical experience in accelerated stalls and advanced maneuvers in order to apply aerodynamic theory. Students are trained on advanced aircraft systems including constant speed propellers and retractable landing gear, the associated emergency procedures for these systems and planning for commercial flight situations. Students completing this course in conjunction with AER 228 will receive the practical flight experience requirements necessary to complete the FAA Commercial Practical Exam and receive a Commercial Pilot Certificate, Airplane, SEL. 
PR: AER 200 and AER 228, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. Lab Fee: $7,200 Spring only

AER 232 (3-0-3) - Basic Instruction

This course covers the techniques of basic flight instruction in order to become an FAA Certified Flight Instructor. Subjects covered include the fundamentals of flight instruction to prepare the student for the FAA Knowledge Exam on the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI). Additionally, this course will analyze basic and advanced flight maneuvers, mechanics and regulations so as to prepare the student for the oral and written FAA Flight Instructor-Airplane exams. 
PR: AER 200 Spring only

AER 233 (0-1-1) - Basic Instruction Lab

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire an FAA Flight Instructor Certificate-Airplane, single engine land. Students will acquire instructional knowledge of the elements of all flight maneuvers and procedures necessary for private and commercial pilot certification. Analysis of the required maneuvers includes the recognition and correction of common student errors. 
PR: AER 200, AER 228, AER 229 or equivalent, Commercial Pilot Certificate-Airplane, single engine land, FAA Second Class Medical Lab Fee: $3,500

AER 236 (3-0-3) - Flight Safety

This course introduces practical safety material, organizations and equipment necessary to conduct safe daily flight operations. All factors including weather, maintenance, equipment and human factors will be examined, with particular emphasis on critical decision making under stress conditions. Proper decision making will be based on knowledge of formal weather briefing techniques, flight plan filing, search and rescue methods, post-crash survival, aircraft maintenance programs, accident/incident reports and forms, airport rescue and firefighting, the role of the NTSB and flight safety organizations, and modern hardware (Doppler radar, HSOS, LLWSAS, TCAS, GPWS). 
PR: AER 103 or permission of the department Fall only

AER 280 (1-6-3) - Aviation/ATC Internship

This course provides a student with the opportunity to explore and gain experience working in an aviation or air traffic control related career. Classroom theory and laboratory experiences, were applicable, are enhanced while working under the supervision of a professional in the industry. Field study will incorporate aviation or air traffic control related assignments and will require scheduled meetings with the instructor. Completion of 90 hours of fieldwork is required and grading is on a pass/fail basis. Students must apply for and receive Instructor or Dean approval to enroll in this course.

BPA 101 (2-2-3) - Chocolate and Confections I

This course introduces students to the history, science, and manufacturing of chocolate. Students gain hands on practical experience in the manufacturing of chocolate from sourcing fair trade, quality cacao beans to the final stages of melanging and conching. They are instructed in the various methods of hand and machine tempering and the preparation and molding of chocolate. A variety of chocolate confections are made including filled, molded, and hand dipped. Students prepare various chocolate garnishes and showpieces. Additionally, proper procedures for the safe operation, care, and sanitation of all machinery, equipment, and molds are covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class.

BPA 201 (2-2-3) - Chocolate and Confections II

This course expands the student’s experience with chocolate by introducing modeling chocolate and techniques for decorating and spraying molded chocolate. Chocolate confections with nuts, crisp, and firm centers are produced. Specialty chocolate desserts are also covered. Additionally, this course introduces students to a variety of sugar techniques that produce a wide variety of confections and decorations to embellish desserts or stand on their own as showpieces. Students produce pastillage, blown, poured, and pulled sugar. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: BPA 101

BMT 101 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Beverage Management

This course covers the basic skills to work at and manage a property that serves alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. It introduces the basic production processes and varieties of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. The course explains laws and procedures related to responsible alcoholic service. Fall only

BMT 102 (3-0-3) - Fundamentals of Beer and Brewing

This course examines the role of beer in a historical perspective throughout the development of civilization. It also presents the different brewing processes, equipment used, styles of beer and the proper service of each type. The course introduces the pairing opportunities with foods and other beverages as well as trends in beer consumption. Spring only

BMT 103 (3-0-3) - Managing Beverage Operations

This course examines the proper operation of establishments serving all types of beverage including alcohol. It details the systems and controls available to maintain a profitable beverage operation. Both retail and wholesale operations are investigated and studied. The course presents an introduction to bartending and mixology. Spring only

BMT 104 (3-0-3) - Spirits, Distillation, and Mixology

This course studies the role of spirits and distillation in a historical perspective covering the development of civilization. It presents the different distillation processes, equipment used, styles of spirits and the proper service of each type. The course introduces the pairing opportunities with foods and other beverages as well as trends in spirit consumption. Fall only

BMT 105 (3-0-3) - Beverage Sales & Merchandising

This course investigates visual merchandising as currently applied by professionals in the retail beverage industry. It presents effective merchandise presentation and the knowledge and skills to create retail environments that maximize sales. Fall only

BMT 250 (0-9-3) - Beverage Management Internship

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation, and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Beverage Management. An instructor-approved internship is required. The internship allows students to combine classroom theory and real-world industry experience, while exploring potential career paths. The course requires completion of 135 hours of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.

BIO 110 (3-0-3) - The Human Body

This course is an introduction to general principles of biology through the study of the human body. Two-thirds of the course covers basic topics in scientific inquiry, chemistry, structure and function of cells and cellular processes, and one-third of the course covers topics in selected human organ systems. This course is intended for non-science majors requiring a non-lab science. 

BIO 111 (3-3-4) - Fundamentals of Biology

This course introduces the fundamental concepts, principles, and phenomena in biology with emphasis on humans. Topics include biological chemistry, cell biology (eukaryotic and prokaryotic), genetics, metabolism and energy, plant diversity, cell reproduction, microbes, ecology, evolution, and forensic biology. Laboratory exercises reinforce lecture concepts employing diverse and modern techniques to perform investigative science, including dissection and online work. This course is designed for the non-science major.

BIO 112 (3-3-4) - Human Biology

This course introduces the structure and function of the human body. The course provides an overview of the major organ systems of the body including the integumentary, skeletomuscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, immune/lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive. The course explores the human body as a biological system having a hierarchical organization. The laboratory complements the lecture topics and includes dissection. This course is not recommended for students pursuing science programs.

BIO 115 (3-0-3) - Current Topics in Biology

This course addresses some of the current major issues in biology such as environmental changes and the Anthropocene Epoch. Students identify components of the scientific method, classify different categories of scientific knowledge, develop the ability to critically analyze scientific literature, and communicate rationally supported opinions about the material discussed during the semester.

BIO 117 (3-3-4) - Biology of the Cell

This course introduces the general principles of biology through the study of the cell. The course covers basic topics in scientific inquiry, chemistry, structure and function of cells, and cellular processes. This course also includes topics of anatomical terminology and tissues. The laboratory portion of the course complements the lecture topics. The course prepares students for advanced courses in the allied health fields. The course is recommended for students seeking an A.S. in either the Sciences or the Health Sciences.

BIO 141 (3-3-4) - Biology I

This is the first semester of a one-year course exploring the principles of modern biology. This course focuses on the development of molecular biology and its impact on modern concepts of cell structure and physiology, cell reproduction and energy transfer. In addition, this course covers genetics, the structure of DNA, and evolution. The laboratory portion of the course consists of topics correlating with lecture and includes dissection. Prior course work in biology and chemistry is required.

BIO 142 (3-3-4) - Biology II

This second semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of molecular, cellular, and organismal biology. Topics include the molecular basis of inheritance, evolution, population genetics, six-kingdom analysis, and the systems of the human body. The laboratory portion is designed in three parts. Part one consists of learning techniques in molecular biology. Part two involves learning characteristics of the six-kingdom system and the dissection of the fetal pig for different body systems. Part three consists of conducting a laboratory research project with a formal presentation of the results. 
PR: BIO 141 S

BIO 149 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Biotechnology

This course is a general overview of the various fields in biotechnology. Topics include current career opportunities, biotechnology research, methodologies used in biotechnology, and bioethics. Fall only

BIO 151 (3-3-4) - Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first course of a lecture-laboratory sequence for the students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics include anatomical medical terminology, cell structure, tissue, the skin, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. The laboratory topics include cells, tissues, and an examination of the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Emphasis is placed on both gross and microscopic work. Prior course work in biology, with particular emphasis on cell biology and biochemistry, and chemistry required.

BIO 152 (3-3-4) - Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second course of a lecture-laboratory sequence designed for the students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics include the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, immune, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive systems, and in addition, metabolism, and fluid and electrolyte balance. The laboratory work covers the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Emphasis is placed on both gross and microscopic work. 
PR: BIO 151

BIO 154 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Pharmacology

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of pharmacology and is designed for students in nursing or other health related fields. It will examine the basic understanding of drug actions, drug absorption, bioavailability, distribution, metabolism and excretion; the administration of therapeutic drugs; drugs that affect the nervous, cardiovascular, and renal systems; drugs with actions on smooth muscle; endocrine drugs; chemotherapeutic drugs; antimicrobials; cancer chemotherapy; immunopharmacology; special aspects of pediatric, geriatric, dermatologic and gastrointestinal pharmacology. 
PR: BIO 151 and 152 and high school chemistry or CHM 113 or equivalent; higher level of chemistry preferred. Fall only

BIO 170 (0-5-2) - Tissue Culture

This course is an introduction to the theory, standard practices, and methodologies of cell culture. Laboratory topics include sterile techniques, media preparation, cell growth, cell culturing, cell counting, maintenance and storage of cell lines, and scale-up. 
PR: BIO 142 Fall only

BIO 171 (0-5-2) - Recombinant DNA Techniques

This is a basic laboratory course in the theory and concepts of recombinant DNA techniques. Topics include restriction enzymes application, methods of cDNA and genomic cloning, analysis of molecular markers, extraction, purification and sequencing of DNA, RNA expression, polymerase chain reaction, production and purification of recombinant proteins and search of biological database and database analysis. 
PR: BIO 142 Fall only

BIO 172 (3-3-4) - General Toxicology

This course provides students to a general overview of the field of toxicology covering the basic principles, target organ toxicity, toxicity of particular compounds, risk assessment as it applies to environmental and medical toxicology. Laboratory topics include application of these concepts through utilizing common analytical techniques used in environmental toxicology and examining case studies. 
PR: BIO 142 Spring only

BIO 173 (3-0-3) - Principles of Immunology

This course introduces the basic concepts in immunology. The course covers the molecular and genetic basis of the immune system. Antigen and antibody 
structure and function, antibody production, cellular based immunity, and the major histocompatibility complex will be emphasized. 
PR: BIO 142 Spring only

BIO 174 (0-5-2) - Immunohistochemistry

This course introduces students to the various techniques used in the preparation, processing, detection, and evaluation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) slides. Techniques of histology, pathology, immunology, and enzymology will be applied to hands-on procedures of tissue processing and evaluation of data. 
PR: BIO 142 Spring only

BIO 203 (3-3-4) - General Ecology

Through lecture and laboratory experiences, this course focuses on the study of major ecological principles including: population and community biology, competition and predation, physiological ecology and adaptations, ecosystems, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and ecological succession. The ecological basis of contemporary environmental problems is examined and related to human activities. Quantitative perspectives and analysis will be used throughout. Portions of the laboratory experience will occur outside the indoor laboratory space. External laboratory exercises will take place on campus property or immediately adjacent spaces, or may involve field trips. 
PR: BIO 142 and CHM 121 Spring only

BIO 241 (3-3-4) - Microbiology

This course covers the principles of microbiology. Topics include microbial diversity, cell structure and function, physiology, genetics, reproduction, microbial pathogenicity and immunology, host resistance and immunity. Also covered are concepts in genetic engineering and biotechnology, industrial microbiology, and microbial ecology. Basic techniques and procedures used by microbiologists are emphasized in the laboratory. 
PR: BIO 112 or BIO 141 or BIO 151 or Approval of the Dean. 

BIO 245 (3-3-4) - Exercise Physiology

Students evaluate the acute responses and chronic adaptations of the body to the stresses of exercise. Major topics include cellular and molecular physiology, histology with emphasis on myology, circulatory, respiratory, neuromuscular systems, and bioenergetics.  
PR: BIO 141 

BIO 261 (3-3-4) - Cell & Molecular Biology

This course covers the principles of cell and molecular biology, including structure, function, and molecular relationships amongst the components of the cell. Major topics include macromolecules, organelles, biological membranes, cell metabolism, growth and replication, energy transformation, extracellular matrix, signal transduction, organization of the genome and regulation of gene expression. 
PR: BIO 142 and CHM 121 Fall only

BIO 262 (3-0-3) - Genetics

This course introduces students to the aspects of modern genetics. Topics include gene structure and function, Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics, gene expression, population genetics, recombinant DNA technology, and genome analysis with emphasis on human aspects and applications. 
PR: BIO 141 and CHM 121

BIO 263 (0-6-3) - Biotechnology Techniques

This course uses the laboratory setting to explore experimental and analytical techniques used in cell biology, molecular genetics and biotechnology to gain an understanding of cell and molecular processes. The course covers biotechnology laboratory skills applicable to research and industrial settings. 
PR: BIO 261 Spring only

BUS 113 (3-0-3) - Business Mathematics

This course emphasizes the concepts of mathematics as they apply to a wide-range of personal and commercial business problems. The topics covered include how to dissect and solve word problems; fractions, decimals; banking; percents and their applications; trade and cash discounts; payroll; simple interest; compound interest and present value; installment buying; depreciation; and inventory and overhead. 

BUS 118 (3-0-3) - Document Formatting

This course uses the touch method in teaching the alphabetic and numeric keys. Emphasis is on formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques using Microsoft Word. Topics include letters, memoranda, reports, and tables. Standard English composition skills are covered in the production of documents.

BUS 121 (3-0-3) - Business Law I

This course focuses on the nature and sources of law pertaining to the legal environment of business, contracts, and commercial transactions.

BUS 123 (3-0-3) - Business Law II

This course focuses on agency and employment law, business organizations, government regulation and property, and its protection. 
PR: BUS 121

BUS 127 (3-0-3) - Business Computer Applications

This course provides hands-on, comprehensive coverage of the concepts and techniques required to use Excel to express, analyze and solve business-related problems. Topics covered include analyzing data with charts and what-if analysis tools, creating pivot tables, managing large workbooks, using advanced sorting and filtering, creating templates, using lookup functions and building complex formulas.

BUS 135 (3-0-3) - Advanced Document Formatting

This course provides advanced document formatting using the functions of Microsoft Word. Word processing commands are applied on a variety of documents such as letters with mail merge, tables, and reports. The student will also be introduced to legal forms, graphic enhancements and meeting management. Proofreading, composition and other language arts skills are integrated and reinforced. 
PR: BUS 118

BUS 212 (3-0-3) - Business Communications

This course provides students with principles of effective communication in business, both written and oral. It focuses attention on the communication process including effective listening, writing and speaking. Topics include analysis of business letters, reports, and memos for organization of ideas, conciseness and clarity. The course also requires writing business letters, memos and messages for electronic media, writing business reports, and an oral presentation. Writing resumes and applying and interviewing for employment are also covered in this course. PR/CR: ENG 123 F,S

BUS 223 (3-0-3) - Business Statistics

This course provides the student with the knowledge to gather, process and present statistical data, construct frequency charts, compute measures of central tendency and standard and quartile deviations. This latter knowledge is then applied to solving business problems in sampling, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and trend analysis. 
PR: MAT 128 F,S

BUS 252 (3-0-3) - Business Plan Development

This award-winning course guides would-be entrepreneurs and existing businesses through the step-by-step process of starting, operating, and managing a business. Students receive training and guidance from successful business owners and advisors, learn about the core topics related to successfully starting and growing a business, work closely with other entrepreneurs, and expand their professional network. A complete business plan is developed and presented to a panel of judges in a competition sponsored by Sunmark Credit Union. Classes are held off-campus at the Capital Region Chamber’s location in Colonie, NY (just off of Wolf Road). Approval by the Division of Business, Criminal Justice and Law and the Capital Region Chamber of Commerce is required to enroll in this course.

BUS 253 (3-0-3) - Introduction Bank Sec Act/Money Laund

This course provides and introduction to the legal framework involving the Bank Secrecy Act and the role of banks in the United States in combating and preventing money laundering and terrorist financing. Topics include review and reporting requirements, assessing risks of services and entities, identification of suspicious activity and associated sanctions. Course material is contextualized in appropriate business entity legal frameworks and internal control structures. 
PR: BUS 121, ACC 240

CHM 112 (3-3-4) - Introduction Gen, Org & Biolog Chem

This course presents the fundamentals of general, organic, and biological chemistry with an emphasis on their relevance to the health sciences. Topics covered include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, solutions, and pH. This course also introduces organic compounds and biological molecules which includes organic functional groups, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and enzymes. The laboratory covers techniques and illustrates the chemical principles covered in the course.

CHM 113 (3-3-4) - Fundamentals of Chemistry

This course covers the fundamentals of chemistry in one semester. Topics include dimensional analysis, Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, and the gas laws. The laboratory illustrates the principles covered in the course. Note: This course requires basic algebraic skills.

CHM 115 (3-0-3) - Consumer Chemistry

This course introduces students to atoms and molecules and applies this to chemistry involved in our everyday lives, such as the chemistry food, household cleaners, personal care products, energy, and materials. The impact of chemistry in our environment will be considered throughout the course.

CHM 121 (3-3-4) - General Chemistry I

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, the gas laws, and enthalpy. The laboratory experiments emphasize techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and illustrate the concepts studied in lecture. Prior coursework in chemistry is required. PR/CR: MAT 118, MAT 148, MAT 154, or eligibility to enroll in MAT 167

CHM 122 (3-3-4) - General Chemistry II

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and their reactions, buffers, solubility and precipitation reactions, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. The laboratory experiments emphasize techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and illustrate the concepts studied in lecture. 
PR: CHM 121 and MAT 118, MAT 154 or eligible to enroll in MAT 167 or higher

CHM 140 (3-3-4) - Fundamentals of Biochemistry

This course provides an introduction to the major classes of organic compounds, followed by an introduction to biochemistry including a study of the structure and function of the four major macromolecules in biochemistry- carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes, and nucleic acids. Other molecules, which are important to the cellular and molecular processes, such as hormones and vitamins, will also be studied. 
PR: CHM 121 Spring only

CHM 228 (4-3-5) - Organic Chemistry I

This course is the first course of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The first semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, and reactions and reaction mechanisms of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, ethers, epoxides, alcohols, and aromatic compounds. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis and the use of instruments for analysis. 
PR: CHM 122 or equivalent Fall only

CHM 229 (4-3-5) - Organic Chemistry II

This course is the second course of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The second semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, reactions and reaction mechanisms of free radicals, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, B-dicarbonyl compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and amines. Special topics may include bioorganic compounds, synthetic polymers, or pericyclic reactions. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis, and the use of instruments for analysis. 
PR: CHM 228 or equivalent Spring only

CSS 119 (3-0-3) - ESL for Academic Writing

This course is targeted for the academically and linguistically diverse population of SUNY Schenectady students or prospective students whose first language is not English. The multilevel approach will focus on the common areas of difficulty in second language writing and reading. Its main goal is to enable students to engage in academic work with skills commensurate with those of native speakers.

CSS 126 (3-0-3) - Integrated Reading & Writing I

The course introduces students to active reading strategies and integrates selected readings with writing assignments that focus on sentence and paragraph structure. It also emphasizes the application of appropriate grammar and mechanics.

COM 100 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Human Communications

This course introduces theories of human communication, especially those that emphasize effective communication practices in a variety of contexts, such as relational, group, public, and intercultural communication situations. The course also explores the impact of digital media and the online world on patterns of human communication.

COM 105 (3-0-3) - Public Speaking

This course introduces the essential steps in preparing and presenting speeches by applying basic communication principles and public-speaking strategies to a variety of speaking assignments.

COM 121 (3-0-3) - Mass Media

This course focuses on how mass media function and impact United States culture. From both a historical and contemporary point of view, it explains the evolution of the eight areas of mass media: books, magazines, newspapers, recordings, radio, movies, television, and new media. It also explores the technological, economic, political and cultural aspects of the media. Communication and mass media theories are examined in tandem with an analysis of the key issues in the field. PR or CR: ENG 123

COM 200 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Media Writing

This course explores the differing writing styles and formats used in a variety of media environments, including print, broadcast, and Web. This course emphasizes gathering relevant and accurate information and writing for specific audiences. Additional topics include writing advertising copy, writing for public relations, and the ethical and legal implications of writing for the media. 
PR: ENG 123 College Composition or equivalent Spring only

COM 231 (3-0-3) - Digital Culture

This course explores the development of the Internet including various social media platforms, and subsequent old and new media convergence. It also examines the resulting digital culture, especially in terms of power structure and social change, and analyzes the effects of digital media on diverse societal groups. PR/CR: ENG 123

COM 235 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Visual Communication

This course analyzes the production and consumption of visual messages, particularly those found in the media, and their impact on human communication. It combines theory and practice to explain how the human mind both processes and creates meaning from visual phenomena. This course examines the history of visual communication, principles of design and color theory, typography, the technology behind both print and electronic media, and technology’s influence on design. The course also explores the idea that images combined with text are powerful ways to inform, educate, and persuade individuals. CR/CON: ENG 123 Fall only

COM 265 (0-9-3) - Communication Internship

This course provides students the opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to communication in a supervised professional setting. An instructor-approved internship is required. The internship allows students to combine classroom theory and real-world experience, while exploring potential career paths. The course requires completion of 135 hours of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. 
PR: COM 121 Mass Media or COM 231 Digital Culture, and permission of the instructor or dean

CIS 102 (1-0-1) - Computing Basics

This introductory course provides the student with the computer basics necessary for working with software applications in a personal computer object-oriented environment. Topics include the basics of computer input/output devices, finding and using virtual help sources and file management. Students will be required to make use of personal computers to complete projects. 

CIS 110 (3-0-3) - Workstation Architecture and Support I (A+)

This is part one of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course covering the foundations of PC configuration and support. Topics include installation of different versions of the Windows operating system, building, upgrading, repairing, configuring, troubleshooting, optimizing, diagnosing and the preventive maintenance of PC’s. Students learn how to build a computer and install different versions of the Windows operating system.

CIS 111 (3-0-3) - Workstation Architecture and Support II (A+)

This is part two of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course. Part two of this course introduces local area networks and servers, preventive maintenance techniques, and specific strategies for troubleshooting hardware and software. 
PR: CIS 110

CIS 121 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Computers

This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of computers and computing including number systems, hardware, architecture, information processing, operating systems, networks (including the Internet) and web design. Additionally, students will complete significant projects utilizing contemporary word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation graphics software. Fundamentals of programming will be explored using modern programming languages. Other software applications may be examined during the semester. 
PR: BUS 115 or equivalent

CIS 129 (3-0-3) - Programming Fundamentals

This course provides an introduction to computer programming using a modern, object oriented programming language. It is intended to be an introductory programming course focusing on programming concepts and fundamentals. 
PR: Eligible to enroll in 100-level math course

CIS 133 (3-0-3) - Programming in Java

This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language, with a focus on developing high quality, functional solutions to problems. Topics include data types, input/output, control structures, GUI interfaces, methods, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. Students will use computer facilities to complete programming assignments. 
PR: CIS 129 F,S

CIS 134 (4-0-4) - C++/UNIX

Students are introduced to commonly used algorithms. Students employ object-oriented design and object- oriented principles in problem solving using the C++ programming language. Students are introduced to the UNIX operating system and shell scripting. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. 
PR: CIS 129 or equivalent

CIS 136 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Web Development

This course provides the student with the essential concepts and process of web page development, starting with Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML) coding and building to more complex layouts using cascading style sheets (CSS). The course will emphasize a disciplined approach to software design and coding. Attention will be directed toward the impact of a designer’s choices on communication, understanding and accessibility. Upon completion, all students will develop an original, dynamic, multi-paged website suitable for publishing on the WWW. CR: CIS 102 or adequate proficiency in basic computing skills

CIS 140 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting

This course teaches the basics of computer aided drafting as applied to engineering drawings using the AutoCAD drafting package. Topics include: fundamentals of computer aided drafting, drafting equipment, orthographic representations, special views, applied geometry and drawing conventions, basic dimensioning, section views, thread representation, detail and assembly drawings, auxiliary views, isometric and other pictorial drawings, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. The student will then learn the fundamentals of 3-D solids and sheet designs using the Autodesk Inventor package.

CIS 221 (3-0-3) - Computer Applications

This course explores several components of the Microsoft Office suite of software applications including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Upon completion of this course, the student will be prepared to test for the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) certification. Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

CIS 223 (3-0-3) - Database Management

This course will give the student a basic overview of Relational Database Design. The student will acquire advanced knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL language. Students will work individually on one large project encompassing all phases of database design and implementation. 
PR: CIS 129 and adequate proficiency in Microsoft Access Fall only

CIS 225 (3-0-3) - Operating Systems

This course will introduce students to Operating System theory and application. Operating System’s concepts and components will be explored in both the UNIX (Linux) and Windows environments. Topics include: process management, communication and synchronization, memory management, device management, file systems, system administration and security. 
PR: CIS 129 Spring only

CIS 229 (3-0-3) - Systems Analysis and Design

This course places an emphasis on a disciplined approach to software development using the application of software engineering principles. Students are provided with a systematic introduction to software development. The course introduces the student to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), including a general overview of a typical business-oriented software system, the analysis of the system, an approach to the design of the system, and a plan for system testing and future maintenance. Students work collaboratively on a computer information systems project encompassing all phases of the SDLC. 
PR: CIS 223 Spring only

CIS 236 (3-0-3) - Advanced Web Design

This course provides a practical introduction to JavaScript and the design of dynamic web pages. The student will enhance the functionality and interactivity of web pages by learning to create and utilize embedded and external JavaScript source code. 
PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136 Spring only

CIS 237 (3-0-3) - Advanced Web Programming

This course is for the student who wants to learn advanced web site programming techniques using contemporary development tools and languages. Concepts relating to server-side programming are explored. 
PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136 Spring only

CIS 240 (3-0-3) - Internetworking Fundamentals

This course provides an introduction to networking. Topics include basic concepts and terminology relating to LANs and WANs including: data communications, types of networks, networking models and theory, protocols, and equipment. There is a strong emphasis on the OSI Model. The material covered in this course is applicable to sections of the Network+ certification exam. Please note that this is not a review course for the Network+ certification exam. CR: CIS 221 or equivalent

CIS 241 (3-0-3) - Routing Fundamentals

This course covers the theory and application of routers to internetwork communications. There is an initial review of TCP/IP, Ethernet, the OSI model, network terminology, protocols, and standards. Primary emphasis is given to static routing and TCP/IP. Dynamic routing protocols are also introduced. Students will have the opportunity to work with simulator software to apply the concepts learned in class to a Cisco internetwork. 
PR: CIS 240 and CIS 110

CIS 244 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Routing and Switching

This course covers the theory and application of routers and switches to network and internetwork communications. Static and dynamic routing technologies are introduced, along with layer 2 switching and VLANs. Students will have the opportunity to work with both simulator software and actual hardware to apply the concepts learned in class. 
PR: CIS 240

CIS 246 (3-0-3) - Data Structures

Students are introduced to some commonly used data structures and their applications using C++. Topics include abstract data types, object-oriented programming, stacks, queues, linked lists, sorting, binary search trees, heaps, and hashing. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. 
PR: CIS 134 or equivalent Spring only

CIS 247 (3-0-3) - Switching and Advanced Routing

This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer. The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. Students will also learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. 
PR: CIS 241

CIS 249 (4-0-4) - Introduction to Routing and Switching

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Topics include how to: configure a router and a switch for basic functionality, configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with dynamic routing protocols, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. 
PR: CIS 240

CIS 250 (4-0-4) - Computer Organization

Students are introduced to the structure and implementation of computer systems at the lower levels: the digital logic level, the microprogramming level, and the conventional machine language level. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. 
PR: CIS 134 and MAT 167 or equivalent F

CIS 251 (4-0-4) - Switching and Advanced Routing

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Topics include how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality, to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Other topics include the implementation and configuration of common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. 
PR: CIS 249 Fall only

CIS 256 (3-2-4) - Introduction to Systems Management

This course introduces topics in managing server-based network operating systems, configurations, security, and troubleshooting. Students will have the opportunity to practice and implement techniques and strategies in class. Students will configure a server to provide file, print, and web services. 
PR: CIS 240 Fall only

CIS 257 (3-3-4) - Advanced Networking and Systems Management

This course covers advanced topics in network communications and administration including server administration, monitoring and troubleshooting. Topics include advanced techniques in file and printer sharing, email and web services. 
PR: CIS 256 Spring only

CIS 259 (1-8-3) - Computer Information Systems Internship

This course provides the computer information systems/computer science student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate computer related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester during final exam week. 
PR: CIS or Computer Science major with minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and permission of the department.

CIS 262 (3-0-3) - Network Security

This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of network and computer security. Topics include server and network hardening, threat assessment, protecting network infrastructure and services, physical security, business continuity and disaster recovery. 
PR: CIS 251 Spring only

CIS 263 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Computer Forensics

This course is designed to introduce students to topics necessary to initiate and complete a successful computer investigation. Students will set up a forensics lab, acquire the proper and necessary tools for a successful investigation, and conduct the investigation with subsequent digital analysis. The materials covered in this course are identical to the International Association of Computer Investigation Specialists (IACIS) and the Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) Certification exam. 
PR: CIS 111 and CIS 225 Spring only

CBB 101 (3-0-3) - Craft Beer Brewing Operations

This course covers the planning, creation, and implementation of a craft beverage operation. Topics explored include planning of location, size, delays, starting and growing the operation, the legal and regulatory opportunities, branding, marketing and sales, and the equipment and technical needs for the operation. Fall only

CBB 102 (3-0-3) - Beers of the World

This course concentrates on the basics of beer appreciation. Topics include geographical beer traits, proper service, and menu offerings. Activities include researching food and beer pairings for compatibility and profitability. Other activities include tasting and comparing beeds of Europe, Asia, and North America. Spring only

CBB 103 (2-2-3) - Craft Beer Production I

This course introduces the study of history, styles, process, technology, ingredients, fermentation and marketplace for craft beer production. Fall only

CBB 104 (2-2-3) - Craft Beer Production II

This course studies the process, technology, ingredients and marketplace for craft beer production. 
PR: CBB 103 Spring only

CBB 250 (0-9-3) - Craft Beer Brewing Internship

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation, and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Craft Beer Brewing. An instructor-approved internship is required. The internship allows students to combine classroom theory and real-world industry experience, while exploring potential career paths. The course requires completion of 135 hours of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.  
PR: CBB 103 CR: CBB 104 

CRJ 113 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course provides the philosophical and historical background of the agencies that compose the criminal justice system. It focuses on the development of justice and law, crime and punishment, the administration of laws, the agencies’ functions, career orientation and public policy. F, S

CRJ 117 (3-0-3) - Police Organization and Supervision

This course offers insight into the essentials of American policing. The historical evolution of American policing will introduce students to the developed concepts, politics, and pressures of modern law enforcement. The operational legal environment will outline the requirements of policing and display the need for adequate management as well as moral and ethical demands required in the field of work. Spring only

CRJ 131 (3-0-3) - Criminal Law

This course emphasizes the study of substantive criminal law. Selected crimes most likely to be dealt with by the criminal justice professional are explored through discussion, where applicable, of the English Common Law precedents, general modern application and specific New York Penal Law. F

CRJ 133 (3-0-3) - Criminology

This course provides an etiology of crime and criminal behavior. The course delves into biological, psychological and sociological theories that examine arrest and conviction data. Analysis of criminal activity through an understanding of the theories is undertaken. Spring only

CRJ 143 (3-0-3) - Criminal Evidence and Procedure

This course presents an in-depth analysis of the rules of criminal evidence. The process of the American criminal justice system will be examined and special emphasis will be placed on Constitutional limitations in the area of criminal evidence and the law of search and seizure. Topics also include concepts of evidence and rules governing its admissibility, theoretical and pragmatic considerations of substantive and procedural laws affecting arrest, and search and seizure. This course demonstrates the importance of case law at the state and federal levels and its impact on the administration of law. Spring only

CRJ 147 (3-0-3) - Terrorism and Public Security

This introductory course investigates the criminal, economic, historical, political, psychological, and social roots of terrorist phenomenon. The course explores existing and potential terrorist threats and how local, national, and global communities may counter these threats.

CRJ 160 (3-0-3) - Serial Killers

This course focuses on the investigation and prosecution of the high impact crime of murder and the transition to multiple murders. Topics include identification and linking of heinous crimes with crime event signatures, motivations of the offender who murders numerous human beings, and patterns of behavior that increases the likelihood of this type of crime. 

CRJ 215 (3-0-3) - Juvenile Delinquency

This course offers an intensive study of the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency. It addresses the nature of youth crime and the critical issues of juvenile delinquency. The course provides students with a greater understanding of the present juvenile justice system including the biological, psychological and sociological approaches being administered in an attempts to reduce juvenile crime. Fall only

CRJ 217 (3-0-3) - Principles of Investigation

This course offers an introduction to the basic principles and a detailed examination of specific offenses. The course focuses on the crime scene, physical evidence interviewing and interrogation, and the use of informers and confessions. The study of specific offenses focuses on the scientific approach and the methodology used in crime detection. Fall only

CRJ 219 (3-0-3) - Corrections

This course provides a broad-based representation of the American correctional system and how it relates to our society. The course will delve into the history of punishment before confinement evolved into modern penal concepts. Analysis of the correctional client as well as facility management is undertaken. Fall only

CRJ 230 (3-0-3) - Interpersonal Violence

This course will provide a unique perspective on the issue of interpersonal violence concentrating on the public perception and criminal justice approach to sexual assaults and sexual offenders. An emphasis will be placed on characteristics and behavioral patterns of the offender and the crime itself. Particular attention will be given to the critical issues of victimology, rape typologies, stalking, domestic violence and criminal/constitutional law. Students will benefit from this course as it explores the etiology of sexually deviant behavior from both sociological and psychological approaches within the functioning of the criminal justice system. Students will learn to develop an informed analysis of sexual offenses, sexual offenders, the public perception and the handling of such offenders within the criminal justice system. 
PR: CRJ 113 or SOC 121 Spring only

CRJ 233 (3-0-3) - Current Issues in Criminal Justice

This course is designed to allow study and discussion of those relevant issues of most current concern affecting components of the criminal justice system. Such issues as hiring practices, community relations, court decisions, and the impact of the mass media may be explored in relationship to the administration of justice in America. Fall only

CRJ 237 (0-0-3) - Criminal Justice Internship

This course provides the opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to criminal justice. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced while working in a supervised professional setting. The field study will incorporate criminal justice or criminal justice related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by scheduled meetings with the instructor. The course requires completion of 120 hours of field work. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. 
PR: Criminal Justice major, completion of 30 credit hours, completion of CRJ 113 and CRJ 131, minimum overall GPA of 2.5, and permission of the Division.

HOT 111 (2-2-3) - Food Preparation I

This course introduces students to the basic principles of food preparation. The topics covered include the theory and history of classical and modern culinary arts, the organization of the classical and modern kitchen brigades, and a basic understanding of environmental sustainability. Students gain actual experience in the preparation of stocks, soups, sauces, vegetables, salads, sandwiches, potatoes, and farinaceous grains. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are strictly enforced. Students are required to have a department approved chef’s uniform and a knife set to participate in class.

HOT 112 (2-2-3) - Food Preparation II

This course introduces students to the more advanced techniques of food preparation. The topics covered include pasta, meat, poultry, and seafood preparation as well as breakfast cookery. The principles of healthy and traditional techniques are utilized. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are strictly enforced. Students are required to have a department approved chef’s uniform and a knife set to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 111

HOT 114 (3-0-3) - Food Administration and Menu Planning

This course presents the role of the menu in any food service operation. The course focuses on factors used in the hospitality industry to determine the selling price of food and beverage in relation to their initial food cost. Particular attention is directed to the importance of the menu in a successful food service operation. Topics covered include menu-rating criteria, truth-in-menu, sales mix, food costing, menu pricing, menu layout guidelines and design, demographic studies, and descriptive terminology.

HOT 116 (3-0-3) - Lodging Management and Operations

Lodging Management and Operations is designed to afford the student with a detailed look into the important role that housekeeping plays in effective hotels and resorts. The course covers how to efficiently care for guestrooms and public spaces; purchasing; safe storage of wares, amenities and chemicals; and procedures to ensure a comfortable and pleasant guest experience. Particular attention is given to identifying various cleaning chemicals and equipment used in the housekeeping department and evaluating their effectiveness. Instruction is provided in the proper use of the chemicals and equipment required to maintain guest and public spaces. The course covers retention to staff. Fall only

HOT 117 (3-0-3) - Food and Beverage Control 

This course presents methods and procedures to make a hospitality business profitable or solvent. The course details the flow of goods, including inventory, forecasting, purchase specifications, purchasing, receiving, storing, inventory control, and issuing of food and beverages. Emphasis is placed on recognizing, calculating, and exploring cost control procedures. These control procedures will include menu pricing, calculating food, beverage, and labor cost percentages and interpreting the results. Food and beverage financial statements will be prepared and examined to assist in creating a solvent business.

HOT 119 (2-2-3) - Elements of Baking

This course introduces students to the basic principles of baking including formula procedures, U.S. and metric measurements, properties of baking ingredients, and the function and proper use of equipment. Students gain actual experience in the preparation of breads, rolls, pies, cookies, quick breads, cakes, and icings. The course emphasizes the basic techniques and procedures of baking. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforce. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class.

HOT 125 (2-3-3) - Cakes and Cake Decorating

This course provides students with instruction and hands-on practice in the production and decoration of cakes using commercial baking techniques. A variety of cake mixing methods are taught. Decorating instruction will begin with lettering, borders, and simple flowers and progresses to the decoration and assembly of a tiered wedding cake. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 119

HOT 131 (3-0-3) - Math for Food Service Records

This course emphasizes math principles used in the culinary profession. It is the basis for understanding and using math to prepare food in cooking and baking courses. The math in this course includes the basics that must be understood in order to solve problems in culinary management. Topics include basic math skills, identifying the dividend, place value, weights and measures, percentages, recipe conversions, recipe yields, baker’s percentage, portion control, item costing, metric measurements and ordering of food and beverages.

HOT 135 (1-0-1) - Sanitation Techniques for Food Service

This course emphasizes the importance of proper sanitation techniques in the food service industry. Special emphasis will be placed upon proper food handling techniques. Topics covered will be HACCP, food-borne illness, proper cooking, handling and storage of food, the knowledge of correct temperatures to prevent food contamination and safe personal hygiene for food handlers. Successful completion of a test will result in a food service sanitation procedures certification awarded by the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association.

HOT 217 (3-0-3) - Front Office Management

This course examines hotel front office practices and procedures, including the reservation process, the structure of the hotel industry, guest services, rate structure, the revenue cycle, and the utilization of technology. Industry vocabulary/jargon is studied.

HOT 218 (3-0-3) - Human Resources Management in the Hospitality and Food Industry

This course explores the basic management responsibilities in the hotel, restaurant and food industries. Special emphasis is placed on human relations, labor laws, motivation, delegation of authority, and the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively use and coordinate human resources. It explores typical supervisory problems and solutions. The course discusses the implementation of strategies, plans and programs required to attract, orient, train, develop, reward and retain the best people to meet organizational goals and operational objectives.

HOT 220 (3-0-3) - Wines of the World

This course concentrates on the basics of wine appreciation. Topics include deciphering and analyzing wine labels and using this information in wine purchasing. Activities include researching food and wine pairing for compatibility. Other activities include testing and comparing wines of Europe and South and North America, including, but not limited to, wines from France, Chile, Canada, California, and New York. Students with a medical condition or with religious beliefs that prevent them from consuming alcohol, may, after receiving approval from the Dean of Hotel, Culinary Arts & Tourism, substitute another HOT or TAT course in place of HOT 220.

HOT 225 (2-3-3) - Commercial Baking I

This course introduces students to the management and operation of a commercial retail bakery. Through a combination of lectures and labs, students will acquire the manual skills and product knowledge necessary to produce and market a range of products. The student rotation is done through seven production stations and one sales/packaging position to operate the College’s Pane e Dolci bakery. The production stations are: quick breads, yeasted bread, rich dough breakfast items, laminated breakfast pastry, cookies and candy, tarts and pies, and cheesecake and cakes. Emphasis is placed on scratch baking, but students also work with mixes, bases, and frozen dough products. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 119 Fall only

HOT 226 (2-3-3) - Commercial Baking II

The emphasis of this course will be on the production of a wide range of baked goods. Students will gain experience in puff pastry, eclair paste, breads and rolls, flatbreads, bagels, doughnuts, tarts, and petit fours sec as they bake for the College’s Pane e Dolci Bakery. A rotation through all stations in the bake shop will ensure that students gain production experience in all these areas as well as practical experience in sales and marketing. The course emphasizes merchandising and sales, ingredient function, and baking chemistry through lectures and bakery visitations. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 225 or HOT 131 and HOT 119 Spring only

HOT 233 (3-0-3) - Basic Principles of Nutrition

This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of nutrition as they pertain to the food service industry. The central focus is on the relationship of food intake to the physical and mental well-being of the guest. Topics covered include: what constitutes a healthy diet, the knowledge of nutrient content, food additives, food fads, nutritional labeling, and nutritional needs for special groups. Food service menus will be analyzed for their nutritional value. F, S

HOT 238 (2-3-3) - Dining Room Management and Operations

Students gain experience in basic restaurant procedures and tableside preparation. Studying under the super- vision of a managing instructor, students participate in the operation of an a la carte restaurant. Students are rotated in the following job positions: manager, assistant manager, reservation manager, service staff, cashier and dishroom operations manager. Emphasis is placed upon proper American a la carte service techniques. Students are required to have a professional wait person’s uniform to participate in class. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. F, S

HOT 250 (0-0-9) - Disney Co-Operative

The Disney Co-Operative internship uses a directed working and learning experience to expand knowledge of successful organizational practices. This co-op is designed to meet a participant’s need for an integrated experiential program that provides transferable knowledge and skills to all participants. Students must complete a minimum of 405 hours at Walt Disney World during the co-op. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis NOTE: The student is responsible for making the necessary transportation arrangements to Walt Disney World 
PR: 2.0 GPA and Permission of Division

HOT 251 (2-3-3) - Quantitative Foods

This course prepares students to create meals for groups that hold their banquets on campus as well as the preparation and plating of a complete banquet menu from American and ethnic cuisines. It also emphasizes quantity and quality as well as proper plating techniques. Planned menus include appetizers, salads, entrees, and desserts. The course allows students to be assigned specific stations by the student chef. It further highlights the proper use of kitchen equipment and a time element to complete individual banquets according to the menu items and guest requirements. The course stresses sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health. 
PR: HOT 111 or consent of the Division Dean

HOT 253 (2-3-3) - Banquet Management and Operations

This course emphasizes the application of banquet and catering principles. This course allows students to actively participate in the management and service of actual banquets in a public setting. This course introduces students to the relevant knowledge, concepts and techniques involved in American banquet service. Russian, French and other forms of buffet service are also introduced. The importance of coordination between back- and front-of-the-house personnel, equipment operation and maintenance, including dishwashing operations, and inventory control are also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are stressed and enforced. Students are required to have a professional waitperson’s uniform to participate in banquets. The time to complete an individual banquet will vary according to menu and guest requirements.

HOT 255 (2-3-3) - Garde Manger

This course presents the basic principles of Grande Manger for hotel, restaurant and industrial food catering establishments. Topics covered include charcuterie and salumi found in various cultures, hors d’oeuvre and canapes, decorative centerpieces, and cheese production and use in recipes. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 111 Fall only

HOT 256 (2-3-3) - Advanced Garde Manger and Meat Cutting

This course presents the discipline of garde manger and meat cutting. The class builds upon the knowledge of charcuterie and preserved meat and vegetable products learned in HOT 255 to produce products for commercial production. The class introduces commercial meat fabrication utilizing commercial cuts from whole carcasses according to the guidelines established in the NAMPS Meat Buyers Guide for use in the College’s commercial dining facilities. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 255 Spring only

HOT 257 (2-4-4) - Classical Cuisine I

This course is conducted in a fully equipped, modern, professional kitchen. Full course a la carte menus are produced according to the seasonal availability of fresh foodstuffs in a planned schedule of progressively more difficult menus. Special emphasis is placed on the pressure of line cooking. Menus for this course are composed of continental dishes and American regional cuisine. This course offers cooking stations of the traditional kitchen system where students function as chef, sous chef, saucier, rotisseur, and tournant. This courses focuses on preparing and cooking the food for the College’s restaurant, which is open to the general public. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. A professional chef’s uniform is required to participate in the class. 
PR: HOT 112 or consent of the division Fall only

HOT 258 (2-4-4) - Classical Cuisine II

This course assigns students to a fully equipped, modern, professional kitchen to prepare and cook for the College’s restaurant. Full course a la carte menus are produced according to the seasonal availability of fresh foodstuffs in a planned schedule of progressively more difficult menus. Special emphasis is placed on the pressure of line cooking. Menus for this course are composed of continental dishes and international cuisine. Students are assigned cooking stations of the traditional kitchen system and function as chef, sous chef, saucier, rotisseur and tournant. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 112 or consent of the School Spring only

HOT 259 (2-3-3) - Regional American Baking and Pastry

This course introduces the basic theory, techniques and recipes of classical pastry making. Students will produce regional desserts, pastries, and breads from across the United States to be served in the Casola dining room and the Pane e Dolci bake shop. A variety of decorating techniques will be taught and utilized to finish the cakes and pastries. Proper use of baking tools and equipment is also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 119 F

HOT 260 (2-3-3) - International Baking and Pastry

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand and refine their baking skills and builds upon the methods learned in previous baking classes. The course covers the production of breads and desserts to be served in the Casola dining room and the Pane e Dolci bake shop. The emphasis is on European baking, though baked goods from other parts of the world may be included as well. Techniques in cake decorating, chocolate work, and sugar boiling are also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 259 or permission from the School of Hotel, Culinary Arts, & Tourism dean Spring only

HOT 268 (2-3-3) - Modern Culinary Trends and Techniques

This course presents a variety of modern culinary- industry trends and techniques. It covers the role of the five senses, the four basic tastes (salty, sweet, sour, and bitter), seasonings, texture, temperature, and balance. The course requires students to taste and to evaluate a range of ingredients found in the contemporary professional kitchen and discover ingredients and flavors from Asian and African menus. Modern techniques and equipment found in today’s professional kitchens will be used. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. 
PR: HOT 112 Spring only

HOT 269 (2-3-3) - Culinary Competition

Students will learn the skills sets essential for culinary competition including time management, sense of urgency, and multitasking. This course utilizes the guidelines set by the American Culinary Federation for hot and cold food competitions. Students will compete in an American Culinary Federation sanctioned culinary competition during the semester. Students will be required to do class work outside the normal course schedule to prepare for and participate in two competitions during the semester. Sanitary practice and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in this class. 
PR: HOT 255 or Consent of Instructor

HOT 275 (3-0-3) - Marketing for the Hospitality Profession

This course concentrates on marketing a hospitality based business. The focus is on the development of a marketing plan for an existing business. It will cover the areas of marketing including publicity, sales, advertising, managing customer information, both consumer and organizational buying behaviors, and the impact of social media on marketing for a hospitality based business.

HOT 276 (3-0-3) - Meetings and Convention Management

This course provides an introduction to the convention, group-meeting and trade-show industry. Emphasis is placed on identifying the various convention, group-meeting and trade-show markets and their unique requirements. It includes an exploration of promotional activities, negotiations, sales, contracts and convention services, as well as various career paths within the industry.

HOT 277 (3-0-3) - Planning and Development of Tourism

This course explores the basics of tourism planning and development. Topics include protecting environmental and cultural assets; minimizing cultural shock between host and guest; enhancing, rather than detracting from, local ways of life; and guaranteeing future populations the ability to enjoy the experience of travel. The course emphasizes an understanding of tourism development as it relates to economics, business, ecology, and government.

HOT 291 (3-0-3) - Computers for the Hospitality Industry

This course introduces students to fundamental computer concepts and application programs that may be utilized in the hospitality industry. Topics include computer components, use of operating systems to manage files and applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, data base management, and Internet use. Specialized hospitality software is discussed and demonstrated for various segments of the hospitality industry.

DST 101 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Distillery Operations

This course studies the planning, creation and implementation of a craft beverage operation. Topics explored include planning of location, size, delays, starting and growing the operation, the legal and regulatory opportunities, branding, marketing and sales, and the equipment and technical needs for the operation.

DST 102 (2-2-3) - Craft Spirit Production I

This course introduces the study of equipment, process, technology, ingredients, fermentation and marketplace for craft spirit production.

DST 103 (2-2-3) - Craft Spirit Production II

This course applies the study of equipment, process, technology, ingredients, fermentation and marketplace for craft spirit production. 
PR: DST 102

DST 104 (3-0-3) - Spirits of the World

This course concentrates on the basics of spirits appreciation through research and tasting. Topics include historical influences on variety, geographical traits on spirits, proper storage, service, and menu creation and offerings. Activities include researching food and spirit/cocktail pairings for compatibility and profitability as well as tasting and comparing spirits from around the world, both straight and mixed in cocktails.

DST 250 (0-9-3) - Craft Spirit Distillation Internship

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation, and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Craft Spirit Distillation. An instructor-approved internship is required. The internship allows students to combine classroom theory and real-world industry experience, while exploring potential career paths. The course requires completion of 135 hours of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.  
PR: DST 102 CR: DST 103

ECH 121 (3-0-3) - Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Early Childhood Education

This course focuses on curriculum development and assessment by applying early childhood education philosophies for children birth through eight years of age. Students reflect upon their roles as teachers in planning, implementing and evaluating criteria that impacts child development and academic content areas. This course emphasizes in-depth studies of developmentally appropriate curriculum models for the methods and strategies that inform the development of meaningful and relevant curricula. Students spend a minimum of ten observational hours in the Laboratory Preschool. (By the end of the first week of class in ECH 121, students must submit (A) a notarized criminal conviction statement and (B) a signed I Will Statement to uphold the National Association for the Education of Young Children Code of Ethics and the SUNY Schenectady Early Childhood Education Program Professional Behaviors.) 
CR: ECH 123 

ECH 123 (3-0-3) - Curricular Methods

This course focuses on cultural, scientific, and mathematical explorations for children birth to second grade. Students utilize STEM materials and experiences to foster children’s critical thinking skills in scientific and mathematical though processes. The course requires students to implement developmentally appropriate social studies, math and science activities to address diversity in children’s learning styles. Students spend a minimum of ten observational hours in the Laboratory Preschool.
CR: ECH 121

ECH 131 (1-8-4) - Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I

This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies and/or the SUNY Schenectady Early Childhood Program Laboratory Preschool. Additionally, in a seminar setting, students reflect on and share their experiences. Students will spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. 
PR: ECH 121 and ECH 123

ECH 220 (3-0-3) - Engendering Creativity: Arts in the Classroom

This course is an exploration of creative expression with an emphasis placed on the importance of the arts in every child’s education. As students unlock their own creative potential, they also become skilled at using methods and techniques that encourage creative development in young children. Students reflect on aesthetics while analyzing the movements and techniques of the visual arts and the genres and elements of music. Students then apply their understanding by presenting art, music, and drama activities to young children. Throughout the semester, students develop an art and music portfolio. Fall only

ECH 225 (3-2-4) - Fostering Emergent Literacy

The course examines the development of literacy skills in children ages birth to 8 years. Multiple opportunities to recognize the developmental stages in literacy acquisition, to identify factors that influence literacy development, and to discuss how to design and implement a literacy program are provided. Genres of literature, curricular themes, and resources for children of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are emphasized. Guidelines for the design and implementation of literature-based activities are applied throughout the course. Students observe for a minimum of 15 hours in an early childhood literacy environment.

ECH 227 (3-0-3) - Guidance of Young Children

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children from ages birth to eight years and the application of appropriate guidance strategies to enhance children’s self-esteem and self-discipline. This course enables students to research and observe the correlation between children’s environments and behaviors. The course analyzes the importance of play, social interactions, and family expectations on children’s development. Spring only

ECH 231 (1-8-4) - Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II

This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies or the SUNY Schenectady Early Childhood Program Integrated Laboratory Preschool. The course requires students to reflect on and share their experiences in a seminar setting. The course also requires students to spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. A service learning implementation is required. 
PR: ECH 131

ECH 234 (3-0-3) - Early Childhood Education Program Administration

This course provides administrative training in the field of Early Childhood Education. This course addresses early childhood education program designs, curricula, ethics, as well as criteria and techniques employed in the start-up and organization of early childhood education programs. Focus is placed on the implementation of national, state, and local mandates in a high quality early childhood education program, including skills necessary to ensure the safety of all program participants and perform effectively as director. Students will complete ten hours of observation in this course.

ECH 252 (3-0-3) - Infant and Toddler Development

This course examines infant and toddler development with an emphasis on the importance of the first thirty-six months in relation to human development. It emphasizes attachment, early brain research, and developmentally appropriate practices as critical factors which impact a caregiver’s role in meeting individual children’s needs. The course requires ten observation hours. Spring only

ECH 260 (1-0-1) - ECH Portfolio Seminar

This capstone seminar is intended for ECH majors who are about to graduate from their Early Childhood Program. Knowledge and skills acquired in the program are reviewed and analyzed to demonstrate their proficiency in a pre-professional portfolio. Opportunity is provided for technical assistance on an individual basis. Each student assembles a portfolio as a summative experience to be presented to a professional review team. 
PR: Permission of the Department Spring only

ECO 211 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Economics

This course provides an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and an understanding of the economic choices that individuals, firms, and governments face. It also introduces the concept of scarcity and the working process of a market economic system. Further, this course examines the different market structures, the role of the firm and the impact of government intervention on markets. Finally, this course discusses the meaning and computation of national income, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade, and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the economy. F, S

ECO 221 (3-0-3) - Principles of Macroeconomics

This course provides an analytical framework for the understanding of the economy at the national level. This course will also analyze the purpose and functions of national income accounting, the components of Gross Domestic Product, the determinants of long run economic growth, the causes and costs of inflation and unemployment. In addition, this course will cover the economic impacts of fiscal and monetary policies and the differences between short run and long run macroeconomic aspects of the economy. Finally, this course will examine the importance of the U.S. financial system, the macroeconomic effects of international trade and the determination of interest and exchange rates. F,S

ECO 223 (3-0-3) - Principles of Microeconomics

This course develops an analytical framework for the understanding of the theory of markets, including the decision-making process in businesses, the impact of technological advances on markets and the functioning of the four different market structures. This course will also provide a closer look at the interactions of individual households, business firms and governments in the marketplace. Finally, this course will discuss economic issues related to the well-being of market participants, the tradeoffs between equity and efficiency, the economics of taxation and subsidies, the economics of healthcare, the economics of poverty and income inequality, labor market issues and the basis of free trade. F, S

ENG 096 (3-0-3) - College Composition Workshop

This course provides students with additional academic instruction and learning strategies to successfully achieve ENG 123 College Composition student learning outcomes. It individualizes grammar and reading instruction. Additionally, the course supports students in developing content, organizing information and ideas, and presenting material to readers in an ePortfolio. Through workshopping projects, students analyze and respond to others’ writing and learn to use feedback from the instructor and peers. Assignments are directly aligned with those in ENG 123. 

ENG 123 (3-0-3) - College Composition

This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing; an oral presentation is required. 
PR: Exemption from placement testing as defined by the Academic Code or successful completion of CSS 127

ENG 124 (3-0-3) - Literature & Writing

This course encourages students to use writing to explore the ways in which literature functions as an art form. Writing and research techniques introduced in ENG 123 College Composition are strengthened and refined. 
PR: ENG 123 

ENG 125 (3-0-3) - College Composition II

This course builds upon the written and oral rhetorical skills established in ENG 123 with a greater emphasis on argumentation and research in academic writing. 
PR: ENG 123 or HON 123

ENG 200 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Creative Writing

Students will learn the essential principles, strategies, and methods of creative writing and will acquire a foundation in the skills necessary to master this art. The emphasis will be on the writing of short fiction, but opportunities will be provided to explore poetry, drama, screenwriting, the novel, and the essay. Students will also learn how to go about getting their work published. 
PR: ENG 123 CR: ENG 124

ENG 205 (3-0-3) - Writing Poetry

This course focuses on developing students’ abilities to write, revise, and analyze poetry. It is primarily conducted as a workshop: students write and revise their own poetry, as well as give oral feedback and produce written critiques of their peers’ poems. In addition, the course introduces students to a variety of poetic forms and asks them to write poetry in these forms. It also introduces them to theories of free verse and to studies of the poetic line and asks them to write their own free verse. The course also includes an oral component: students practice reading their own and others’ poems to the class. Last, the class introduces students to opportunities for performing and publishing their poetry. 
PR: ENG 123

ENG 211 (3-0-3) - Technical and Professional Writing

This course applies the principles of effective writing to the specific forms of professional and technical writing. It emphasizes designing texts and oral presentations for professional audiences after analyzing the needs and values of those audiences. 
PR: ENG 123

ENV 100 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Environmental Science

This one-semester course introduces students to environmental concepts and issues. The course covers environmental issues and controversies from ecological, biological, social, economic, ethical and governmental policy positions. In addition, the course emphasis is placed on the tools and techniques needed to understand and analyze environmental topics such as energy, solid waste, food production, resource depletion, air and water issues and global climate change. 
PR: High School Algebra or MAT 128

ENV 105 (0-2-1) - Environmental Science Laboratory

This course enables students to apply the theories introduced in ENV 100: Introduction to Environmental Science. Students apply these theories through a combination of laboratory and applied learning activities. It introduces students to topics such as energy and land usage, solid waste, water and air issues, and climate change, as they are applicable to the Capital Region and Mohawk River watershed. Note: This laboratory portion, taken concurrently with ENV 100, is for students whose program requires a 4-credit science lab course or for transfer purposes, but do not intend to major in a physical science or mathematics.

ENV 195 (3-0-3) - Oceanography in the Age of Climate Change

This course gives the non-science major a multi-disciplinary understanding of the human-ocean relationship and how Global Climate Change is affecting the geological, chemical, and biological aspects of the world’s oceans. Topics include changes in the ocean temperatures, salinity, acidity, and sea-level rise and their impact upon ocean dynamics, weather, seashore erosion, fisheries, and marine biodiversity, as well as human geopolitics and economics. Discussions include consequences of global warming and marine pollution. Students examine, critique, and analyze these topics using the scientific method and disciplinary approaches from a scientific, social, political, and economic perspective.

ETH 221 (1-0-1) - Professional and Applied Ethics

This course provides exposure to leading ethical theories as well as an opportunity to employ these principles. Aided by viewing videotaped, dramatized scenarios, the reasons advanced for acting ethically and the excuses given for not acting ethically will be studied. The consequences of freedom and personal responsibility will be explored, as will the ability to recognize ethical issues. F,S

FYS 100 (1-0-1) - First Year Seminar

This course is designed to help students develop skills to support academic success and degree completion. It provides an opportunity for students to build a connection to the college and other students. Students learn about the resources available at the college, how to navigate critical technology used at the college, and work with librarians to develop their information literacy skills. Additionally, students set educational goals, explore discipline-specific topics, and learn about a variety of topics including the transfer and advising processes, careers, scholarships, and campus regulations. Students successfully completing the course leave with a “toolbox” of skills to support their academic success.

FSS 120 (1-0-1) - Freshman Success Seminar

The First Year Success Seminar is an orientation course designed to enhance the success of first-year college students by introducing such topics as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services and resources, major/career planning, stress management, and personal wellness.

FRE 121 (3-0-3) - Elementary French I

Elementary French I provides an introduction to the French language for students with no previous French studies or one year of high school French. It develops elementary grammar, syntax, and written and oral communication skills. This course examines Francophone cultures throughout the world. This course requires the completion of a minimum of five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

FRE 122 (3-0-3) - Elementary French II

Elementary French II is for students who have completed FRE 121 or two years of high school French. This course concludes elementary-level grammar studies. It further develops syntax and written and oral communication skills as well as examines Francophone cultures throughout the world. This course requires the completion of a minimum of five documented hours of lab work outside of class. 
PR: FRE 121

FRE 222 (3-0-3) - Intermediate French I

This course provides an extensive review of French grammar, and concentrates on helping students improve their vocabulary, conversational fluency and reading skills through the discussion of selected readings in French. Classroom discussions on the readings and French culture are held primarily in French. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. 
PR: FRE 122 or permission of the instructor

FRE 224 (3-0-3) - Intermediate French II

A continuation of Intermediate French I, this course completes the review of French grammar and provides more reading of French literature and non-fictional prose. Classroom discussions in French are held on the readings and on French customs and culture. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. 
PR: FRE 222 or permission of the instructor

GHY 121 (3-0-3) - Physical Geography 

This is a one-semester, non-lab science course in physical geography. Weather elements and climate characteristics are examined. Detailed consideration is given to each climate region, the location of that region, and the causes for that climate. Geologic factors that shape land forms are examined. Consideration is given to the flora and fauna of each climate region, including the causes for the distribution of these biologic assemblages. A strong emphasis is placed on teaching the locations of various geographic features. Fall only

GEO 143 (3-3-4) - Physical Geology

This is the first part of a two-course sequence introducing students to the nature, processes and formation of Earth’s material and the majors features of the earth’s crust and topography. This course will consider the mineralogy of the rocks, different rock types and structures. Detailed consideration will be given to the internal processes that shape the earth’s surface, including plate tectonics, igneous activities, weathering, erosion and deposition and earthquakes. 
PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. F

GEO 145 (3-3-4) - Surface Geology

This is the second part of a two-semester sequence introducing students to the features of the earth’s crust and topography. This course will consider the various geologic agents and processes that produce, shape and modify the surface environment. Detailed consideration will be given to the rise and decay of mountains, moving water, glaciers, deserts, shorelines and oceans as well as comparative planetary geology with other bodies in the Solar System. 
PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. NOTE: Students using Geology as a lab science sequence are advised to take GEO 143 before GEO 145. Either course may be taken alone as a single lab science elective. S

HEA 100 (3-0-3) - Medical Terminology

This course provides students with the core knowledge and terminology used in the medical and healthcare-related professions to describe the organ systems of the human body and to understand diagnoses, therapies, drug classification and the basics of pharmacology. The course also covers the application of medical terminology in the context of a medical record management environment.

HEA 101 (3-0-3) - Healthcare Ethics & Law

This course introduces students to standards of ethical practice in healthcare. The legal requirements and regulations and their application and use in decision making in healthcare are covered. There is an emphasis on government regulations regarding the handling of patient information and patient treatment, as well as examination of professional ethical dilemmas.

HIM 110 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Healthcare Information Systems

This course provides students with an introduction to the significant changes and trends in the Health Information Management profession. The course covers healthcare information systems, career paths within the profession, and clinical data management.

HIM 112 (3-0-3) - Electronic Healthcare Delivery

This course introduces students to an integrated approach to Practice Management and the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The course provides practical experience using simulated clinical activities provided by Medisoft Clinical Applications software. CR: HIM 110

HIM 201 (3-0-3) - Healthcare Billing and Reimbursement

This course introduces students to the various healthcare reimbursement systems, reimbursement methodologies and payment processes. The relationship between coding systems, insurance claims and reimbursement is emphasized. Managing the billing cycle and resolving issues with insurance claims are covered. 
PR: HIM 112 Spring only

HIM 202 (3-2-4) - Current Procedures in Terminology

This course introduces students to physician services coding, billing and data quality procedures. Students will learn to read, interpret and code physician office documentation. Special emphasis is placed on assigning Evaluation and Management (E/M) codes, outpatient diagnostic coding guidelines, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), and Health Care Financing Administration Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes. 
PR: HEA 100, HIM 110, and HIM 112 CR: HIM 201, HIM 203 Spring only

HIM 203 (3-2-4) - ICD Coding Systems and Lab

This course introduces students to disease and operation classification using the International Classification of Disease, (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM). The course covers diagnosis-related groups and their relationship to coding, the historical development of the International Classification of Disease, and various nomenclature and classification systems. The course will require students to differentiate between the various abstracting methods used to collect patient data. 
PR: HEA 100, HIM 110 and HIM 112 CR: HIM 201, HIM 202 Spring only

HIM 204 (1-8-3) - Professional Internship Experience

This course is a supervised clinical practice experience in a healthcare setting. The course provides students with experience performing the coding of patient health records including application of coding systems and the use of coding software. A minimum of 96 hours in the clinical experience, which may be scheduled over a six to 12 week period, as determined by the placement site, is required. Attendance at a weekly seminar that offers professional development activities and involves the use of internship software to prepare for career entry is also required. 
PR: HEA 100, HEA 101, HIM 110, HIM 112, HIM 201, HIM 202 and HIM 203 Summer only

HSC 100 (1-0-1) - Introduction to the Health Professions

This course is designed to enhance the success of first- year students who are interested in a career in a health- related profession. It will assist students in making informed career choices by exposing them to a variety of health professions and the process necessary to become a health care professional. Also, students will be introduced to the tools and skills needed to become a successful college student, such as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services, and orientation to the campus.

HSC 101 (3-0-3) - Introduction Health Profes & Ethic

This course, designed for students interested in allied health careers, explores the basic concepts of the health professions including the delivery of health care and the laws governing the health care system. This course presents a broad overview of the health professions and covers topics in ethics, workplace settings, terminology, and conduct with an emphasis on cultural competency. Also, guest speakers working within the health care system share their knowledge and expertise in a seminar setting. Students also examine the credentialing and licensing requirements of health care professions on a state and national level. This course culminates in individual student seminar presentations.

HIS 125 (3-0-3) - Western Civilization to 1650

This course introduces students to the development of Western Civilization from ancient times to 1650. It focuses in particular on political, cultural, social, and economic aspects for the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period.

HIS 127 (3-0-3) - Western Civilization Since 1650

This course introduces students to the development of Western Civilization since 1650. It focuses in particular on economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period. F,S

HIS 130 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Black History in the United States

This course is an overview of Black history and culture in America. It examines a broad range of experiences from the first documented arrival of Blacks in colonial America in 1619 to the present. 
PR: Any college-level history course

HIS 227 (3-0-3) - American History to 1877

This course is an introduction to American history to 1877. It covers political, economic, legal, and cultural events; explores the experiences, opportunities, and perspectives of diverse people; and investigates the historical contributions of members of various groups, including those often excluded from or marginalized in narratives about the evolving nation. The course examines the rights and opportunities of citizenship, and related patterns of inclusion and exclusion. It explores American interactions with other parts of the world, and serves as an introduction to the methods and skills historians use to reconstruct the past.

HIS 229 (3-0-3) - American History Since 1877

This course is an introduction to American history from 1877 to the recent past. It covers political, economic, legal, and cultural events; explores the experiences, opportunities, and perspectives, of diverse people; and investigates the historical contributions of members of various groups, including those often excluded or marginalized in narratives about the evolving nation. The course examines the rights and opportunities of citizenship, and patterns of inclusion and exclusion in relation to these. It explores American interactions with other parts of the world, and serves as an introduction to the methods and skills historians use to reconstruct the past.

HIS 231 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Russian History

This course surveys the history of Russia and related areas from the earliest times to the present. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments. It includes the geographical areas of present-day Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and other areas of significant Russian influence, such as the imperial conquests and Soviet Republics of Central Asia, the Caucasus, and the Baltic States. It also focuses on Russian relations with European and other world powers, as well as ethnic Russian interaction with other ethnicities that are or have historically been part of the Russian/Soviet state.

HIS 232 (3-0-3) - World Civilizations to 1600

This course surveys world civilizations from ancient times to about 1600. It emphasizes political, economical, social, and cultural developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS 233 (3-0-3) - History of Women and Gender in the United States

This course uses the lens of women’s and gender history from the colonial period to the recent past to survey major themes in the development of American civilization. It focuses on variables such as race, class, sexual orientation and national origin, and how they impacted the way in which women understood their lives and had access to opportunity. It also covers individuals who stand out as heroines and firsts, and explores how gender has shaped the experiences of all Americans. 

HIS 234 (3-0-3) - World Civilizations Since 1600

This course surveys world civilizations from about 1600. It emphasizes political, cultural, economic, and social developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS 237 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Chinese History

This course surveys the history of China and related areas from the earliest times to the present. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments. It also focuses on Chinese relations with European and other world powers, as well as ethnic Chinese interaction with other ethnicities that are or have historically been part of a Chinese state.

HIS 241 (3-0-3) - European Witch Trials

This course surveys the history of the persecution of accused witches from the Medieval through the Early Modern era in Europe (ca. 600-1700), and including New England. The focus is on the anthropological, religious, legal, political and socio-economic contexts in which beliefs about magic and witches arose and were widely accepted. Attention is given to regional variations in witch beliefs and trial procedures. It also surveys the growth of skepticism, toleration, and the gradual decline of witch persecution to around the end of the 17th century. Finally, it considers some 20th and 21st century analogs to the European witch trials around the world. 

HIS 243 (3-0-3) - The Viking World

This course introduces students to the history and culture of the Vikings and associated peoples, both in their Scandinavian homelands and abroad in the British Isles, Continental Europe, Russia, North America, and the Middle East. The course starts with prehistory and concludes around the late 12th century, with special focus on the Viking-Era (ca.750-1100). It focuses on political, economic, and cultural aspects of Viking-Era Scandinavian societies, including Icelandic skaldic poetry and saga literature. The course also focuses on the interrelations and mutual influences of these societies with neighboring peoples.

HIS 250 (3-0-3) - Topics in History

This is a research-based seminar course that examines an instructor-selected topic area of history. The course emphasizes the analysis of primary and secondary sources and introduces the fundamentals of historiography. It guides students through the process of choosing a research topic and selecting appropriate source material. The course aids them in developing essential skills in the application of historical reasoning and argument to a particular project.  It is strongly suggested that students complete at least two history courses before enrolling in this course. Spring only
Hospitality & Tourism

TAT 121 (3-0-3) - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

This course introduces students to the basic principles of the hospitality and tourism industry. The course explores economic, social, and cultural impact of the industry on the global marketplace. Emphasis is placed on the components of the hospitality and tourism industry and their interdependence.

TAT 140 (3-0-3) - Event Management

This course explores the logistics involved in event planning. Scope and size of events will be examined in detail. Topics include concept, design, feasibility, marketing, financial management, risk management, staging, staffing, leadership, ethics, safety and security, and careers in this area of the hospitality industry. Spring only

TAT 231 (0-9-3) - Hospitality & Tourism Management Internship

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation, and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Hospitality and Tourism Management. An instructor-approved internship is required. The internship allows students to combine classroom theory and real-world industry experience while exploring potential career paths. The course requires completion of 135 hours of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.  
PR: Hospitality & Tourism Management major, completion of TAT121, completion of 30 credit hours, minimum overall GPA 2.0, and permission of Division.

HUS 133 (3-0-3) - Child Maltreatment: Prevention, Investigation, Treatment

This course focuses on a cross-disciplinarian perspective of child abuse and neglect by investigating such factors as possible causes, manifestations, and prevention techniques. This course examines the role of the mandated reporter as well as laws and legislation regarding child maltreatment. It also emphasizes methods and strategies used by professionals to work with children and families in abusive and neglectful situations. A service learning advocacy experience is required.

HUS 150 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependency

This course examines alcoholism and substance abuse from historical, biological, psychological, social and cultural perspectives. It presents theoretical frameworks that help students understand the nature and course of chemical abuse and dependency, as well as strategies to prevent its onset. The course introduces the assessment and diagnostic process as well as treatment approaches. F

HUS 157 (4-0-4) - Substance Abuse Counseling

This course will focus on alcoholism and substance abuse/dependency counseling. Current research, theoretical models, and methods in the treatment process will be examined. The practical development of counseling skills will be emphasized. This course can be used as a social science elective. 
PR: HUS 150

HUS 221 (1-8-3) - Field Instruction I

This course provides students with an initial structured and supervised direct practice experience in a local public or private institution, supervised by a qualified professional. It requires a minimum of 108 hours of field work and nine classroom hours of instruction, integrating and reinforcing social work theories. This course is graded as pass/fail. 
PR: SOC 125, SOC 127, and Human Services major, Direct Support Professional or Community Health Worker with a 2.0 minimum GPA and permission of the Dean or Instructor is required.

HUS 222 (1-0-3) - Field Instruction II

This course provides students with a second structured and supervised direct practice experience in a public or private institution, supervised by a qualified professional. This course focuses on similar topics in Field Instruction I, at a more in-depth level. It requires a minimum of 108 hours of field work and nine classroom hours of instruction, integrating and reinforcing social work theory. This course is graded pass/fail. 
PR: SOC 125, SOC 127, HUS 221, and Human Services major, Direct Support Professional or Community Health Worker major with a 2.0 minimum GPA and permission of the Dean or Instructor is required.

HUS 225 (1-10-4) - Chemical Dependency Internship and Seminar I

This course provides an initial opportunity to obtain experience within the field of chemical dependency at an approved agency. The course integrates field work practice with theory and emphasizes the student’s roles and responsibilities and the agency’s relationship to the larger community. The field experience requires a minimum of 150 clock hours at a New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) licensed facility under the supervision of a qualified health professional. Students must provide documented experience in a minimum of 8 of 12 Credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC) core functions. Students must submit a signed fieldwork contract by the end of the fifth week of classes. Failure to do so requires the student to withdraw from the class. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.  
PR: HUS 157, minimum grade point average (GPA) 2.0, and permission of Instructor or Dean.

HUS 226 (1-10-4) - Chemical Dependency Internship and Seminar II

This course provides a second opportunity to obtain experience within the field of chemical dependency at an approved agency. The course integrates field work practice with theory and emphasizes the student’s roles and greater responsibilities and the agency’s relationship to the larger community. The field experience requires a minimum of 150 clock hours at a New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) licensed facility under the supervision of a qualified health professional. Students must provide documented experience in all 12 Credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC) core functions. Students must submit a signed field work contract by the end of the fifth week of classes. Failure to do so requires the student to withdraw from the class. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.  
PR: HUS 225, minimum grade point average (GPA) 2.0, and permission of Instructor or Dean

HUS 250 (3-0-3) - Planning, Assessment, and Treatment

This course introduces students to all the major theories and methods employed in the assessment and treatment of substance abuse and addictive illnesses. It explains and requires students to apply the processes, procedures, and tools required to effectively assess and evaluate clients in developing an individualized plan of treatment. The course stresses the Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) 12-Core Function of the Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC), enabling students to produce psycho social assessment reports and create treatment plans that consider the needs of special populations, ethical concerns, treatment models and clinical strategies. 
PR: HUS 150

HUS 254 (3-0-3) - Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs

This course examines how alcohol and other psychoactive drugs affect the body, the brain, behavior, and influence all areas of human development. Psychoactive drug categories are discussed with the emphasis on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug action. Current theories about the etiology of major psychological and addictive disorders and the rationale for substance abuse drug treatment are examined. 
PR: HUS 150

HUS 255 (3-0-3) - Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Prevention/Education

This course focuses on substance abuse prevention education as it relates to the individual, family, and community. It examines the core components of the creation and implementation of culturally relevant substance abuse prevention education at various levels from pre-school to adult, and requires students to complete the New York State Mandated Reporter training for preventing and reporting child abuse.

HUS 260 (4-0-4) - Problem Gambling

This course focuses on the assessment and treatment of problem gambling. It provides a broad overview of the field of problem gambling which includes theories of causation, gambling trends, and theoretical treatment and prevention models, modalities, approaches and techniques. The course further explores the impact of problem gambling on the health and well-being of both individuals and communities including strategies that emphasize the collaborative community mental health model.  
PR: HUS 150 or current CASAC-T or CASAC documentation

ITA 121 (3-0-3) - Elementary Italian I

This course is designed for beginners or for those with one year of high school Italian. It provides an introduction of the Italian language through the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It also examines Italian culture. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab; students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

ITA 122 (3-0-3) - Elementary Italian II

This course is designed for students who have completed Elementary Italian I, or two years of high school Italian. It continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills covered in Elementary Italian I. The course continues to provide an understanding of the civilization, culture and customs of Italy. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab; students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class. 
PR: ITA 121 or two years of high school Italian

LIT 210 (3-0-3) - Children’s Literature

This course examines literature written for children from preschool through high school. It explores a variety of genres and forms and traces the historical development of literature for children and adolescents. The course emphasizes the elements of literature as they apply to this genre, and focuses on social and cultural themes in literature for children and young adults. Critical approaches to literature will be discussed and applied to texts. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 211 (3-0-3) - Native American Literature

This course introduces students to the large and diverse array of literature produced by Native Americans in North America, from pre-contact oral literature to contemporary writings in English. Genres studied include any or all of the following: myths; chants, ceremonies, and rituals; songs; speeches; personal narratives; essays; poems; short stories and novels. The course concentrates on post-contact literature, especially on the issues faces by men and women of native descent in the United States. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 214 (3-0-3) - African American Literature

This course introduces students to the large and diverse array of literature produced by Africans and African Americans in North America, from slavery to the modern period. Genres studied include fiction (novels and short stories), drama, poetry and song, and non-fiction prose. The course emphasizes the ways in which African and African American authors have articulated and responded to issues of identity and empowerment within the Euro-American context. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 215 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Poetry

This course is an introduction to poetic genres, forms, and modes. It fosters appreciation for and critical analysis of poetry and acquaints students with the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of that poetry. This course also introduces students to poetics, prosody, and poetry criticism. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 216 (3-0-3) - Mythology

This course introduces students to selected major myths, and to representative or noteworthy minor myths, which various cultures have created in their efforts to come to terms with perceived reality. The course also explores the belief systems which underlie those myths. Finally, the course enables students to recognize the continued value and relevance of myth and myth making. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 220 (3-0-3) - Women’s Literature

This course introduces students to the large and diverse array of literature produced by women from different eras, cultures, and nations. Genres studied include any or all of the following: fiction (novels and short stories), drama, poetry, and non-fiction prose. The course emphasizes the ways in which women authors have articulated and responded to gender-related issues within largely patriarchal societies. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 221 (3-0-3) - Hispanic Literature

This course introduces students to the literary works of major Hispanic authors of the Americas. The course explores the ways in which Hispanic authors have responded to issues, such as: identity, colonization, culture, political and economic policies and immigration. Knowledge of the Spanish language is not required. PR/CR: ENG 123

LIT 223 (3-0-3) - The Detective in Fiction and Film

In this course students study the history and development of detective fiction. They read and analyze works of detective fiction from a variety of historical periods and view and analyze some of the genre’s pivotal films. Discussions focus upon the elements of fiction as they apply to this genre, the historical, societal, and ethical aspects of detective fiction, and the elements of film noir. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 225 (3-0-3) - Contemporary World Fiction

This course explores prose fiction from around the world written since the mid-twentieth century by authors of various nationalities, ethnicities, and races. It covers the aesthetic and cultural dimensions of the individual works in the context of relevant literary and cultural cross-currents. 
PR: ENG 123

LIT 231 (3-0-3) - Drama Classics to 1870

This course surveys works of world dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks to the nineteenth century. It examines characteristic values and styles of the Classical, Medieval, Early Modern, Baroque, and Romantic periods in their tragic, comic, and mixed modes. 
PR: ENG 124

LIT 232 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Dramatic Literature

This course examines dramatic literature as a literary form. It analyzes the formal elements of plays, such as plot construction, dialogue, character, staging, and setting; it also focuses on the plays’ social, cultural, and historical contexts. By focusing on representative plays by Western playwrights from the classical Greek period through the contemporary era, this course emphasizes diversity of form and provides students with awareness of the culturally and ethnically diverse worlds these plays represent. PR: ENG 124

LIT 233 (3-0-3) - Drama Classics: Modern and Contemporary

This course surveys major schools of dramatic literature from the latter 19th to the 21st century, e.g. Realism, Naturalism, Expressionism, Symbolism, Epic Theater, Surrealism, Absurdism, Post- Modernism. It places primary emphasis on the works, theories, and influences of major European and American dramatists. 
PR: ENG 124

LIT 252 (3-0-3) - British Literature Before 1800

This course surveys works of British literature from its origins in pre-Norman England through the eighteenth century. It fosters students’ appreciation for literature and their acquaintance with texts written in English during the years of this survey; introduces them to the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these texts; and hones their critical thinking skills in the analysis of literature. 
PR: ENG 124 or HON 124 Fall only

LIT 254 (3-0-3) - British Literature Since 1800

This course surveys works of British literature from the eighteenth-century to the present. It fosters students’ appreciation for literature and their acquaintance with texts written in English during the years of this survey; introduces them to the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these texts; and hones their critical thinking skills in the analysis of literature. 
PR: ENG 124 or HON 124 Spring only

LIT 256 (3-0-3) - American Literature to 1865

This course surveys writing in America from pre-colonial times through 1865, focusing on how the historical growth of the country contributed to the emergence of a distinctly American literature. The course will cover key literary figures and movements within the diverse range of American literary history, including those historically under- represented. 
PR: ENG 124 Fall only

LIT 258 (3-0-3) - American Literature Since 1850

This course surveys American Literature from 1865 through the present, focusing on the growing diversity in authorship and formal experimentation during this period. Literature by key literary figures, representative of major movements, will be examined. The course will also introduce more experimental works and emerging authors. 
PR: ENG 124 Spring only

LIT 260 (3-0-3) - The American Short Story

This course focuses on the American short story as a literary form. It emphasizes the diversity of the form by looking at a variety of early, modern, and contemporary short stories from a variety of regions, cultures, and ethnic groups. It analyzes the formal elements of short fiction and also focuses on its social, cultural, and historical contexts.

LIT 266 (3-0-3) - Science Fiction and Fantasy

This course provides an introductory exploration of the literary genre of science fiction. It identifies the thematic and formal characteristics of the genre, and traces its development from and relationship to other forms of literature and the history of science. 
PR: ENG 123 and either ENG 124 or HON 124

LIT 270 (3-0-3) - The Bible as Literature

This course introduces students to the Old and New Testaments as literary artifacts. It focuses on literary form and technique. The course examines such literary genres, forms, and techniques as poetry, prophecy, epistolary writing, epic, genealogy, parable, character and characterization, theme, imagery, and symbolism. In addition, the course surveys the historical construction of the Bible and considers different versions of some biblical texts. Last, it examines the Bible’s influences on later literary and artistic works. 
PR: ENG 124 or HON 124

LIT 275 (3-0-3) - Topics in Literature

This course extends and refines skills of literary analysis and interpretation. It emphasizes study within a specific literary tradition or oeuvre, but the thematic focus of the course varies. 
PR: ENG 124

MGT 123 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Business

This introductory course gives students a broad overview of the contemporary world of business. Topics include: fundamentals of business and economics, business ethics/social responsibility, competing in global markets, forms of business ownership, starting and growing a business, management, and marketing (product, distribution, promotion, and pricing strategies).

MGT 127 (3-0-3) - Human Resource Management

This introductory course gives students a broad overview of the contemporary world of business. Topics include: fundamentals of business and economics, business ethics/social responsibility, competing in global markets, forms of business ownership, starting and growing a business, management, and marketing (product, distribution, promotion, and pricing strategies).

MGT 135 (3-0-3) - International Business

This course will provide a survey of the interrelationships of world business operations; an introduction to current conceptual perspectives; cultural, educational, political and economic constraints; the international financial and trade frameworks; and the problems and challenges facing the transnational corporation. 
PR: MGT 123 Spring only

MGT 213 (3-0-3) - Principles of Management

This course provides an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing and communicating. Topics include management theory, ethical and social responsibilities required of managers, decision making, organizational culture, motivating employees, increasing cooperation within groups and teams, and global management. CR: MGT 123

MGT 215 (3-0-3) - Sales and Services

This course is co-taught by a certified professional trainer from Sandler Training, one of the leading sales training and leadership development companies in the world, and a faculty member in the college’s business program. Topics covered include establishing rapport and trust with prospects, uncovering the prospect’s need, budget, and decision-making process, making effective presentations, improving your attitude, behavior, and technique, and creating an effective prospecting plan. Students are trained off-campus where they will be in direct contact with other selling professionals. Approval by the Division of Business, Criminal Justice and Law and Sandler Training is required to enroll in this course.

MGT 221 (3-0-3) - Managerial Finance

This course provides an overview of the principles and quantitative techniques used in financial management. In addition, the course examines the role of the financial manager. Topics include time value of money, measures of risk, models for pricing bonds and stocks, financial analysis, capital structure, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and working capital management. Finally, the course introduces financial problem-solving using
Microsoft Excel or other computer spreadsheet programs. 
PR: ACC 121 or 123, CIS 102 or higher and MAT 128 or higher Spring only

MGT 230 (3-0-3) - Strategic Management

This strategic management course covers mission, goal, strategy formulation, strategy implementation and strategy evaluation. Various strategic techniques are introduced including industry analysis, analysis of the competitive environment, key success factors, strategic scenario analysis and SWOT analysis. Additional topics covered include strategic thinking, competitive advantage, vertical and horizontal integration, and planning horizon in a global environment. 
PR: MGT 135 Spring only

MGT 242 (3-0-3) - Entrepreneurship

This course gives students a comprehensive overview of the management of small and entrepreneurial ventures. Topics covered include pursuing franchising and existing business opportunities, creating a business plan, exploring target markets, developing the right marketing mix, pricing and credit strategies, selling, and effective customer service. In addition, the course also reviews understanding and managing start-up, fixed and variable costs, managing risk, operating for success, location, facilities and layout, human resources and management, leadership, and ethical practices. PR/CR: MGT 123

MGT 250 (0-0-3) - Business Internship

This course provides the opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to business. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced while working in a supervised professional setting. The field study will incorporate business or business related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by scheduled meetings with the instructor. The course requires 120 hours of field work. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. 
PR: Business major, completion of 30 credit hours, minimum overall GPA of 2.5, and permission of the Division.

MGT 251 (0-0-6) - Disney Co-Operative

The Disney Co-Operative internship uses a directed working and learning experience to expand knowledge of successful organizational practices. This co-op is designed to meet a participant’s need for an integrated experiential program that provides transferable knowledge and skills to all participants. Students work an average of 35 hours a week at Walt Disney World during the fall or spring semester. NOTE: The student is responsible for making the necessary transportation arrangements to Walt Disney World or Disneyland. 
PR: 2.0 GPA and Permission of Division

MKT 223 (3-0-3) - Marketing

This course emphasizes the role of marketing in organizations. Topics include developing marketing strategies, ethical behavior and social responsibility, the marketing environment, understanding consumer behavior, global marketing, creating and managing products, services, and brands, pricing products, promotion, using social media and mobile marketing to connect with consumers and personal selling.

MAT 081 (3-0-3) - Quantitative Reasoning Workshop

This course provides students with additional academic instruction and learning strategies to complete the student learning outcomes for MAT 123 Quantitative Reasoning. With a focus on differentiated and personalized instruction, this course reinforces prerequisite concepts and addresses learning gaps in mathematics so that students can receive just-in-time support for the concepts covered in MAT 123. This course supports the student learning outcomes for MAT 123 through group work, one-on-one support, and concept-focused activities in an informal workshop setting.

MAT 082 (3-0-3) - Statistics Workshop Lab

This course provides students with additional academic instruction and learning strategies to complete the student learning outcomes for MAT 147 Statistics. With a focus on differentiated and personalized instruction, this course reinforces prerequisite concepts and addresses learning gaps in mathematics so that students can receive just-in-time support for the concepts covered in MATH 147. This course supports the student learning outcomes for MAT 147 through group work, one-on-one support, and concept-focused activities in a informal workshop setting.

MAT 083 (3-0-3) - College Algebra and Trigonometry Workshop

This course provides students with additional academic instruction and learning strategies to complete the student learning outcomes for MAT 154 College Algebra & Trigonometry. With a focus on differentiated and personalized instruction, this course reinforces prerequisite concepts and addresses learning gaps in mathematics so that students can receive just-in-time support for the concepts covered in MAT 154. This course supports the student learning outcomes for MAT 154 through group work, one-on-one support, and concept-focused activities in an informal workshop setting.

MAT 118 (3-0-3) - Technical Math

This course stresses basic algebraic functions, functional notation, trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, exponents, radicals, complex numbers, and vectors. 
PR: Eligible to enroll in 100-level math course

MAT 123 (3-0-3) - Quantitative Reasoning

This college level course integrates numeracy, proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, and understanding of functions. The Quantway model of productive persistence is paired with an activity-based approach to explore numerical concepts, quantitative reasoning, probability, and descriptive statistics as well as linear, quadratic, and exponential modeling. Students develop conceptual and procedural tools that support the use of key mathematical concepts in a variety of contexts. Each student must purchase access to the online platform for this course.

MAT 126 (3-0-3) - Descriptive Statistics

This practical statistics course focuses on simple statistical presentations common to a variety of career fields. The course focuses on the following topics: descriptive vs. inferential statistics; organizing and describing data; measures of central tendency; measures of variation; measures of the position; the normal distribution with applications; linear correlation, and regression. Students are required to work with Excel spreadsheets and should be comfortable using computers. Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements

MAT 145 (3-0-3) - Topics in Contemporary Math

This course introduces mathematics as a liberal art with various contemporary applications. The course covers logic, sets, combinations and permutations as well as number bases. The instructor also chooses from among the following topics: voting and apportionment; management science and graph theory; topics in geometry, as well as the nature of growth. Students should have two years of high school math, which includes a course in algebra and some geometry.

MAT 147 (3-0-3) - Statistics

This course focuses on the following topics: descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, random variables and probability distributions, the binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square distributions, linear correlation and regression. 
PR: Eligible to enroll in a 100-level math course 

MAT 148 (3-0-3) - College Algebra

This course concentrates on the application and analysis of algebraic problems as they occur in a variety of disciplines. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions and models and an introduction to regression analysis. Other topics include solution of equations and inequalities, sequences and matrices. Methods of proof such as algebraic derivation as well as the use of counterexamples to disprove mathematical statements are explored. 
PR: Eligible to enroll in 100-level math course

MAT 149 (3-0-3) - Topics in Finite Mathematics

This course introduces topics in finite math with applications to business, social sciences, computing, and/or life sciences. Topics include logic, functions, mathematical models, the Method of Least Squares, systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, sets and counting, probability, probability distributions, random variables, expected values, and Markov Chains. 

MAT 154 (3-0-3) - College Algebra & Trigonometry

This course includes algebraic and graphical analysis of various functions, including linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Topics include function notation, domain and range, rate of change, basic function transformations, and systems of equations, as well as the Unit Circle and applications of both right triangle trigonometry and vectors.   

MAT 167 (4-0-4) - Precalculus With Analytic Geometry

This course includes the following topics: functions, functional composition, inverse functions, domain and range, interval notation, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric, functions and graphs, analytic geometry, including parametric equations, polar coordinates and conics, systems of equations, introduction to limits and applications. 
PR: MAT 118 or MAT 154 or eligible to enroll in MAT 167

MAT 180 (4-0-4) - Calculus I

This course, in the calculus of a single variable, includes, limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, the Mean Value Theorem, antiderivatives, definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course introduces applications of differentiation such as curve sketching and optimization problems as well as applications of integration such as area and average value. 
PR: MAT 167 or equivalent 

MAT 181 (4-0-4) - Calculus II

This course, in the calculus of a single variable, concerns recognizing, analyzing, and calculating problems in the following topic areas: the calculus of inverse trigonometric functions, integration techniques, application of integration, L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, plane curves, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and polar curves. 
PR: MAT 180 or consent of the department 

MAT 210 (3-0-3) - Discrete Structures: Logic & Proof

This course provides an introduction to the non-continuous side of mathematics. The course focuses on techniques of mathematical proof including mathematical induction, direct proof, indirect proof, and proof by contradiction. Topics include relations and functions, symbolic logic and predicate calculus, number theory, combinatorial methods as well as an introduction to graph theory. 
PR: MAT 180 Spring only

MAT 222 (3-0-3) - Ordn Differential Equations

This course provides an introduction to ordinary differential equations. The course includes linear differential equations, systems of differential equations, series solutions, boundary value problems, existence theorems, Laplace transforms and applications to the sciences. 
PR: MAT 181

MAT 240 (4-0-4) - Calculus III

Topics covered in this course include three- dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, calculus of functions of several variables, partial differentiation and multiple integration. Additionally, The Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals and Green’s Theorem, as well as vector fields are covered. 
PR: MAT 181 Spring only

MAT 242 (3-0-3) - Linear Algebra

This course covers the following topics: vector spaces, the structure of Rn, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications. Linear transformations and inner product spaces are also covered. 
PR: MAT 180 Fall only

MFS 101 (2-2-3) - Mobile Food Service I

This course will offer the basic information needed to run a mobile food service operation and will discuss food trucks, food carts, and food trailers for various vending opportunities. It will demonstrate and execute the use of a mobile food service operation with the production of salads, sandwiches, soups, and variety of cooking techniques. The course stresses sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health.

MFS 102 (2-8-6) - Mobile Food Service II

This course discusses menu development, equipment maintenance and troubleshooting, truck maintenance, human resources, and codes for local and state regulations. Practical experience in mobile food service operation is provided. Students operate the food truck at off site venues. The course stresses sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health. 
PR: MFS 101

MFS 103 (2-8-6) - Mobile Food Service III

This course offers the opportunity for students to gain additional experience in operating a mobile food service operation. Students are responsible for menu development and costing, equipment maintenance and troubleshooting, and adherence to local and state regulations. Students apply what they have learned while they execute, staff, and manage a food service concept they have designed. The course stresses sanitary practices and emphasizes compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health. 
PR: MFS 102

MUS 100 (1-0-1) - Basic Ensemble

This course is designed to develop skills in music reading and ensemble performance. Class time is dedicated to sight-reading music in classical, jazz, and folk styles; reading and performing rhythm and scale exercises; and preparing music for performance. Fall only 
PR/CR: MUS 135 or permission of the Dean

MUS 106 (3-0-3) - Ear Training and Sight Singing

This course develops students’ competencies in sight singing in major and minor keys as well as reading skills in simple and compound meters using solfège—movable Do and Do based minor—and Gordon based rhythmic patterns. Students also develop ear training skills including identifying melodic intervals and triad quality.

MUS 112 (1-0-1) - Music Notation Software Basics

This course introduces basic music notation through the use of the notation software program Avid Sibelius. Students learn the conventions of staff music notation while using Sibelius to create scores for various instruments, voices, and ensembles. Students examine and create a wide variety of scores, including music for solo instruments, chamber ensembles, lead sheets for jazz and popular standards, and classical and romantic symphonies. In addition to traditional staff notation, students also study instrument-specific notation and special technique notation as found in contemporary and non-traditional music. The course includes an arrangement project for a small ensemble of transposing and non-transposing instruments. Student projects are performed in class. Students use Sibelius on individual computers during class and have access to these computers during the day to complete assignments. Though not required, students may wish to acquire a version of Sibelius for use on their own computer. Spring only

MUS 113 (1-0-1) - Basic Ensemble II

This course develops music reading and performance skills through sight reading, rehearsal and performance in an ensemble setting. Students sight read music in a variety of styles and meters; read and perform more complex rhythm and scale exercises; and prepare music for performance as part of an ensemble. Spring only
PR/CR: MUS 135 or permission of the Dean

MUS 114 (0-4-1) - Wind Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of large and moderate size works primarily for brass, woodwinds, and percussion. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance. The course provides an experience in concert preparation and rehearsal techniques along with positive performance experiences. Performances will be open to the public. 
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor
CR: MUS 114 or MUS 122 or MUS 124 or MUS 126 or MUS 132 or MUS 160

MUS 115 (3-0-3) - Rock Music Style and Development

This course explores the historical development of rock music in terms of musical style as well as of rock music’s role as a social, cultural, economic and political force. The course covers the pre-existing styles (pop, country and western, rhythm and blues, jazz, folk, gospel and classical music) that impacted the evolution of rock music. Directed listening exercises emphasize music listening skills and reinforce concepts of musical style and elements such as rhythm, pitch, dynamics, timbre and form.

MUS 116 (0-2-1) - Jazz Ensemble

This course provides students with the opportunity to perform classic and contemporary jazz music for big band. Performances will be open to the public and occur both on and off campus.
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 117 (1-0-1) - Flute Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of chamber music for various size flute ensembles. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance with special emphasis on the development of independence in chamber music performance skills. The course provides an experience in concert preparation and rehearsal techniques along with positive performance experiences. Performances will be open to the public.  
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 118 (0-3-1) - Vocal Chamber Ensemble

This course provides students opportunities to perform a broad range of classic and contemporary works for chamber choral ensemble. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of proper musical techniques including singing, diction, as well as performing in a variety of languages.  
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 119 (1-0-1) - Brass Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of chamber and larger size works for brass instruments. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance with special emphasis on the development of performance skills. The course provides an experience in concert preparation and rehearsal techniques along with positive performance experiences. Performances will be open to the public.  
PR: Audition/ Permission of Instructor

MUS 120 (3-0-3) - World Music Styles

This course is a comprehensive survey of the musical works and styles of world cultures from Africa, the Middle East, the Muslim world, the Arab world, India, Indonesia, East Asia, and the Americas, and explores the meaning and function of music in culture and society. Musical examples range from selections from major urban centers to small villages. Students focus on composers and compositions that made important contributions to the development of music and examine the effects and influences of society, culture, geography, and technology on the evolution of music of various genres within each cultural region. Through active online listening, students analyze specific works focusing on their stylistic elements, genres, and respective cultures. Fall only

MUS 121 (3-0-3) - The Enjoyment of Music I

This course is a survey of art music of the Western world from the Middle Ages through the Twenty-first Century. By examining music from major style periods, students learn to recognize standard Western instruments and elements of music, including melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form. Students develop listening skills through in-class activities and online music listening assignments. Students develop an understanding of the defining characteristics of the major style periods by examining great musical works and studying major composers from each era and by exploring the relationship between music and other art forms.   

MUS 122 (1-0-1) - Guitar Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of chamber music for various size guitar ensembles. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance with special emphasis on the development of independence in chamber music performance skills. The course provides an experience in concert preparation and rehearsal techniques along with positive performance experiences. Performances will be open to the public.  
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor
CR: MUS 114 or MUS 122 or MUS 124 or MUS 126 or MUS 132 or MUS 160

MUS 124 (1-0-1) - Classical Guitar Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of chamber music for various size classical guitar ensembles. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance with special emphasis on the development of independence in chamber music performance skills. The course provides an experience in concert preparation and rehearsal techniques along with positive performance experiences. Performances will be open to the public. 
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 126 (1-0-1) - Percussion Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of large and moderate size works for mixed percussion. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance with special emphasis on the development of multi-instrument percussion skills. The course provides an experience in concert preparation and rehearsal techniques along with positive performance experiences. Performances will be open to the public. 
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor 

MUS 127 (3-0-3) - Jazz Styles and Development

This course is a comprehensive survey of the works and styles of jazz, a uniquely American art form, and its relationships to popular and art music including pre-jazz styles such as ragtime and blues, swing, bebop, cool, third stream, avant-garde, fusion, and contemporary music. Students focus on composers and compositions that are important to the development of jazz, and examine effects and influences of society, culture, and technology on the evolution of various jazz genres. Through active online listening, students analyze specific works focusing on their stylistic elements, genres, and respective time periods. 

MUS 128 (1-0-1) - Jazz Combo

This course provides students with opportunities to perform classic and contemporary jazz music in a small group format. Special emphasis is placed on group interaction, improvisation, and independent playing. Performances will be open to the public and occur both on and off-campus. 
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 130 (1-0-1) - Chamber Ensemble

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of mixed instrument chamber music. Students are given the opportunity to perform works selected on the basis of artistic and historical significance as well as pedagogical importance with special emphasis on the development of independent rehearsals, the course provides positive chamber music performance experiences.
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 131 (3-0-3) - African American Music Survey

This appreciation and literature course is a survey of African American musical genres and styles. Topics of study range from the slave and folk songs of 19th century America to the popular and classical compositions of the 
20th and 21st century African Americans. An emphasis will be placed on the development of listening skills.

MUS 132 (0-4-1) - Chorus

This course provides students with the opportunity to perform a broad range of classic and contemporary works for chorus. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of proper musical techniques including singing, diction, as well as performing in a variety of languages.

MUS 133 (3-0-3) - Digital Music and Beats Production I

This course introduces the basic music theory concepts, their application to the organization of percussion beats and music samples in varying music styles. The course also covers the organization of tempo maps, sampling, and drum beats using Avid Pro Tools software, as well as the creation of original compositions using MIDI to enhance existing music samples. Basic legal topics such as copyright, leasing, and registering original pieces of music are covered. Fall only

MUS 134 (3-0-3) - Digital Music and Beats Production II

This course includes the creation of compositions and beats through the synthesizing of original sounds and using recording techniques to blend in live instruments. Analysis of modern beats and the replication of techniques used by popular music producers is covered as well as recording vocal top lines over compositions. Industry standard software such as Boom, Xpand!2, and Structure Free in conjunction with Avid Pro Tool 12 is used. Spring only
PR: MUS 133
PR/CR: MUS 147 and MUS 179

MUS 135 (1-0-2) - Applied Music I

Applied Music I and II consists of weekly one-on-one lessons with a studio instructor and is designed to help students achieve basic competencies in musical performance. Students study techniques and repertoire appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice. With the studio instructor’s guidance, students will set personal goals in musicianship and work towards those goals. The course is also used to prepare students for an entrance audition for the A.S. or A.A.S. music degree programs. In addition to the lessons, a minimum of fourteen hours of weekly individual practice is required.

MUS 136 (1-0-2) - Applied Music II

Applied Music I and II consists of weekly one-on-one lessons with a studio instructor and is designed to help students achieve basic competencies in musical performance. Students study techniques and repertoire appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice. With the studio instructor’s guidance, students will set personal goals in musicianship and work towards those goals. The course is also used to prepare students for an entrance audition for the A.S. or A.A.S. music degree programs. In addition to the lessons, a minimum of fourteen hours of weekly individual practice is required.
PR: MUS 135

MUS 147 (3-0-3) - Music Fundamentals

The basic course in fundamentals of tonal music is designed to develop competencies in the reading and writing of notes, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords, and rhythmic elements.

MUS 151 (2-0-2) - Theory I

Theory I covers the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, modes, triads, seventh chords, and cadences. This course prepares the student for more detailed analysis of rhythm, texture, and form, with an emphasis on basic harmony and eighteenth century voice leading practices. 
PR: Acceptance into A.S. or A.A.S. music program. 
PR/CR: MUS 155 Fall only

MUS 152 (2-0-2) - Theory II

Theory II builds on the concepts of Theory I (MUS 151) and covers the eighteenth century voice leading practices, root movements and progressions, and figured bass theory and usage. Dominant seventh chords and non-dominant seventh chords are introduced. Also included are secondary dominants, modulation, applications of cadential formulas, and dance forms including binary and simple ternary forms. 
PR: MUS 151 PR/CR: MUS 156 Spring only

MUS 155 (1-1-1) - Aural Skills I

This course focuses on skills to enhance performance through the recognition, mental imaging and vocal performance of a broad range of musical structures. The course begins with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, intervals, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing, harmonic, rhythmic and melodic dictation and the use of solfège as a learning and study tool. 
PR: MUS 151, Acceptance into music degree program. MUS 151 may be taken concurrently.

MUS 156 (1-1-1) - Aural Skills II

This course continues and expands skills developed in Aural Skills
I (MUS 155). The course designed to enhance performance through the recognition and mental imaging of a broad range of musical structures and continues work in the fundamentals of tonal music: scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns. The course introduces modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversions of seventh chords, and four voice chord progressions and patterns. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing and the use of solfège as a learning and study tool. 
PR: MUS 155 PR/CR: MUS 152 Spring only

MUS 157 (2-0-1) - Conducting I

This course introduces the basic techniques and competencies of conducting: posture and hand position, baton usage, foreign and technical terms, a survey of large ensemble repertoire, metric patterns in two, three, and four, instrumental transpositions, string bowings, score reading, preparation and analysis, preparatory gestures, gestures of syncopation, fermata and caesura problems. Prepare and conduct simple scores in class and analyze orchestral and other scores. Other topics will include rehearsal technique and interpretation. 
PR: MUS 152 PR/CR: MUS 257 Fall only

MUS 158 (2-0-1) - Conducting II

This course continues study of the basic conducting techniques with simple, compound, asymmetric and subdivided metric patterns, as well as rehearsal techniques and planning. Separate instrumental and choral conducting techniques are introduced. Students learn a systematic procedure for marking scores and conduct scores in class. Other topics include cuing and left hand independence, changing tempi, concert programming and interpretation. 
PR: MUS 157 Spring only

MUS 160 (1-0-1) - Orchestra

This course provides the student with a medium for the performance of large and moderate size musical works primarily for woodwinds, brass, percussion and strings. Students perform selected music based on artistic and historical significance, as well as pedagogical merit. The course provides experiences in rehearsal techniques, concert preparation, and culminating performances. Performances will be open to the public.
PR: Audition/Permission of Instructor

MUS 163 (2-0-2) - Performance Concentration I

Performance Concentration develops the student’s performance and teaching skills to the highest possible level through the careful study of techniques, sight-reading/sight-singing and repertoire appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice with a private studio instructor. Weekly Performance Classes with division instructors provide practical experience in performance and critical analysis. In addition, this course requires attendance of several faculty, student, and guest artist concerts presented throughout the semester which provide demonstrations of peer and professional level performance techniques. Division Recitals, given towards the end of the semester, provide a practical experience for each student in formal performance. A final performance examination is administered by a faculty panel, including the studio instructor, at the conclusion of MUS 164 and MUS 264. This course is restricted to students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts: Music A.S. or Music Audio Technology A.A.S. degree.
PR: Acceptance into A.S. or A.A.S. music program
CR: MUS 114 or MUS 122 or MUS 124 or MUS 126 or MUS 132 or MUS 160

MUS 164 (2-0-2) - Performance Concentration II

Performance Concentration develops the student’s performance and teaching skills to the highest possible level through the careful study of techniques, sight-reading/sight-singing and repertoire appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice with a private studio instructor. Weekly Performance Classes with division instructors provide practical experience in performance and critical analysis. In addition, this course requires attendance of several faculty, student, and guest artist concerts presented throughout the semester which provide demonstrations of peer and professional level performance techniques. Division Recitals, given towards the end of the semester, provide a practical experience for each student in formal performance. A final performance examination is administered by a faculty panel, including the studio instructor, at the conclusion of MUS 164 and MUS 264. This course is restricted to students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts: Music A.S. or Music Audio Technology A.A.S. degree.
PR: MUS 163
CR: MUS 114 or MUS 122 or MUS 124 or MUS 126 or MUS 132 or MUS 160

MUS 167 (1-0-1) - Percussion Techniques

Percussion Techniques familiarizes students with the fundamentals of percussion performance and pedagogy. Topics include snare and other drum techniques, timpani, mallet percussion, Latin percussion and other non-Western styles, accessories and percussion ensembles.
PR: Acceptance into A.S. or A.A.S. music program

MUS 169 (1-0-1) - Guitar Techniques

This course develops basic competencies in guitar accompaniment for classroom singing. Students focus on basic guitar techniques including strumming, finger picking, scales, and chords. Students also learn basic pedagogical approaches for teaching beginning guitar. Students are required to obtain an acoustic guitar (nylon or steel strings) for class use. (This course is not applicable for students who are enrolled in Guitar Performance Concentration.) 
PR: Acceptance into A.S. or A.A.S. music program

MUS 171 (2-0-2) - Beginning Voice Class

This course presents the fundamentals of basic vocal production and is appropriate for students with no prior vocal instruction. Students develop vocal technique with an emphasis on proper breathing and voice placement through the study of classical and folksong repertoire. The course introduces techniques in pronunciation and diction, pitch control, tone development, and song preparation in Italian, English, and other languages. The course also introduces the basics of vocal anatomy. In addition, students explore the differences between classical, jazz, pop, and musical theater vocal techniques. Vocal score reading is emphasized throughout.

MUS 178 (3-0-3) - Audio Recording I

This course presents the basic elements of sound as well as sound generation and recording. Students work on the routing of sound and the principles of recording and tracking in a virtual mixing console environment. The course also covers utilizing specialized equipment for audio tracking including preamps, various types of microphones, compressors and limiters. Other topics include Pro Tools software; the principles required to complete a recording project, from initial set up to final mix; and industry-specific terms used by recording engineers to describe and measure sound levels and frequency content. 
PR/CR: MUS 106 or MUS 147 or MUS 151

MUS 179 (3-0-3) - Audio Recording II

This course builds on and is a continuation of MUS 178 Audio Recording I. Using AVID ProTools software in conjunction with a Pro Control 24 automated mixing console and an Avid M-box, students will complete a variety of audio projects, including music as well as radio and TV commercials. Course projects incorporate mixing and mastering techniques using multi-band compression, equalization, and limiting. 
PR: MUS 178; and MUS 106 or MUS 151
CR: MUS 147 or MUS 152

MUS 180 (1-0-1) - Introduction to Music Therapy

This course is an introduction to the music therapy career field. It presents the historical background and philosophical basis of music therapy. The course examines music therapy processes and how they are applied across a number of client populations. This course also explores the role of the music therapist as a healthcare field professional and the education and training required to become a board certified music therapist.

MUS 181 (2-0-2) - Beginning Piano

This course provides group instruction for beginning level students. Students learn to read music and develop technical proficiency at the piano through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Keyboard ensemble activities are stressed and provide additional opportunities for rhythmic and musical development.

MUS 182 (2-0-2) - Intermediate Piano

This course provides group instruction for intermediate level students. Students further develop music skills and technical proficiency acquired in MUS 181 through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Keyboard ensemble activities are stressed and provide additional opportunities for rhythmic and musical development. 
PR: MUS 181 or permission of the Instructor or Dean. Fall only

MUS 230 (3-0-3) - Live Sound Reinforcement

This course introduces concepts of analog and computer-based audio signal path, equipment selection, and systems design. The course provides aural skills training necessary for live sound reinforcement and covers aspects of live sound microphone selection/placement and mixing. 
PR: MUS 152 or permission of the Dean.

MUS 231 (3-0-3) - Music Business I

This course explores the history and development of the music industry and gives the student experience in identifying and navigating practical, legal, and procedural issues within the music industry. This course also provides an overview of music merchandising, music publishing, recording arts management, copyright law and licensing as well as identifies career options throughout the music business. Fall only

MUS 232 (2-0-2) - Jazz Improvisation I

This course introduces the study of jazz improvisation. Students learn the elements of jazz harmony through the study of chords, scales, modes, arpeggios, and harmonic formulae as well as transcription and analysis of historic improvised solos. Students use these skills and knowledge to improvise over common jazz forms including modal, blues, and AABA song form. 

MUS 235 (3-0-3) - Music Business II

This course continues the examination, begun in MUS 231, of practical, legal, and procedural issues encountered in the music industry. The course explores music publishing, recording arts management, artist management, emerging trends and technologies, marketing, and the recording industry and its history. Career options in the music business are identified throughout the course. 
PR: MUS 231 Spring only

MUS 251 (2-0-2) - Theory III

This course reviews and builds on the concepts of Theory II (MUS 152) beginning with an emphasis on original four-voice chorale composition in accordance with common-practice harmonic and counterpoint principles. The course introduces the voice leading and analysis of borrowed chords, Neapolitan 6th chords, augmented 6th chords, and chord extensions (9th, 11th, and 13th chords). The course also introduces variation technique and rondo form. 
PR: MUS 152 PR/CR: MUS 255 Fall only

MUS 252 (2-0-2) - Theory IV

Theory IV builds on the concepts of MUS 251, Theory III and covers two-voice eighteenth century counterpoint, altered dominants, chromatic mediants, enharmonic modulation, and common tone diminished 7th chords. There is a focus on the analysis of sonata form. Twentieth century topics include impressionism, twelve-tone techniques, and the analysis of pitch class sets. The course includes a review of classical and romantic forms. 
PR: MUS 251  PR/CR: MUS 256 Spring only

MUS 255 (1-1-1) - Aural Skills III

This course continues and expands skills developed in MUS 156 Aural Skills II. The course is designed to enhance performance through the recognition and mental imaging of a broad range of musical structures and continues work in the fundamentals of tonal music: scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns. The course introduces chromatic and secondary harmonies, modulation to closely related keys, leaps greater than a sixth, asymmetrical meters, changing meters and tempi. Students aurally recognize, notate, vocally reproduce, and analyze these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing, the use of solfège—movable Do and Do based minor—and Gordon based rhythmic patterns. 
PR: MUS 156 PR/CR: MUS 251 Fall only

MUS 256 (1-1-1) - Aural Skills IV

This course continues and expands skills developed in MUS 255 Aural Skills III. The course is designed to enhance performance through the recognition and mental imaging of a broad range of musical structures and continues work in the fundamentals of tonal music: scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns. The course introduces foreign modulation, augmented sixth chords, impressionist devices, twelve-tone technique, set theory, and other twentieth century elements. Students aurally recognize, notate, and vocally reproduce, and analyze these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing, the use of solfège —movable Do and Do based minor—and Gordon based rhythmic patterns. 
PR: MUS 255 PR/CR: MUS 252 Spring only

MUS 257 (3-0-3) - Literature and Style I

This course is a comprehensive survey of the works and styles of Western art music in the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical periods. Students focus on composers and compositions that made important contributions to the development of music, and examine the effects and influences of society, culture, and technology on the evolution of music of various genres. Through active online listening, students analyze specific works focusing on their stylistic elements, genres, and respective time periods. 
PR: Acceptance into A.S. or A.S.S. music program. 
PR/CR: MUS 151 and MUS 155

MUS 258 (3-0-3) - Literature and Style II

This course is a comprehensive survey of the works and styles of Western art music in the Romantic, Twentieth Century, and Contemporary periods. Students focus on composers and compositions that made important contributions to the development of music, and examine the effects and influences of society, culture, and technology on the evolution of music of various genres. Through active online listening, students analyze specific works focusing on their stylistic elements, genres, and respective time periods. 
PR: MUS 257 PR/CR: MUS 152, 156

MUS 263 (2-0-2) - Performance Concentration III

Performance Concentration develops the student’s performance and teaching skills to the highest possible level through the careful study of techniques, sight-reading/sight-singing and repertoire appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice with a private studio instructor. Weekly Performance Classes with division instructors provide practical experience in performance and critical analysis. In addition, this course requires attendance of several faculty, student, and guest artist concerts presented throughout the semester which provide demonstrations of peer and professional level performance techniques. Division Recitals, given towards the end of the semester, provide a practical experience for each student in formal performance. A final performance examination is administered by a faculty panel, including the studio instructor, at the conclusion of MUS 164 and MUS 264. This course is restricted to students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts: Music A.S. or Music Audio Technology A.A.S. degree.
PR: MUS 164
CR: MUS 114 or MUS 122 or MUS 124 or MUS 126 or MUS 132 or MUS 160

MUS 264 (2-0-2) - Performance Concentration IV

Performance Concentration develops the student’s performance and teaching skills to the highest possible level through the careful study of techniques, sight-reading/sight-singing and repertoire appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice with a private studio instructor. Weekly Performance Classes with division instructors provide practical experience in performance and critical analysis. In addition, this course requires attendance of several faculty, student, and guest artist concerts presented throughout the semester which provide demonstrations of peer and professional level performance techniques. Division Recitals, given towards the end of the semester, provide a practical experience for each student in formal performance. A final performance examination is administered by a faculty panel, including the studio instructor, at the conclusion of MUS 164 and MUS 264. This course is restricted to students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts: Music A.S. or Music Audio Technology A.A.S. degree.
PR: MUS 263
CR: MUS 114 or MUS 122 or MUS 124 or MUS 126 or MUS 132 or MUS 160

MUS 270 (1-0-1) - Studio Literature

This course offers a series of one-on-one sessions with the student’s Performance Concentration studio instructor. The student is guided through the study of the seminal literature that has historically, musically, and technically impacted their concentration including orchestral excerpts and operatic excerpts where appropriate. Recorded performances are studied to reinforce the student’s understanding of style and performance practice. This course is intended to prepare the student for MUS 272 (Recital) and guides the student through the process of selecting an appropriate recital program for performance in MUS 272 in a subsequent semester. 
PR: Approval of School of Music faculty and studio instructor CR: MUS 163, 164, 263, or 264 (Performance Concentration I, II, III, IV)

MUS 272 (1-0-1) - Recital

This course offers a series of one-on-one sessions with the student’s Performance Concentration instructor. The student is guided through the process of planning, preparing, and performing a solo recital. Repertoire selections for this recital are the end result of MUS 270, Studio Literature. In addition to the musical preparation, the student is guided through the coordination of each aspect of the recital, from the facilities arrangements to the actual performance. 
PR: MUS 270 CR: MUS 163, 164, 263, or 264 (Performance Concentration I, II, III, or IV)

MUS 278 (3-0-3) - Audio Recording III

This course builds on and is a continuation of MUS 179 Audio Recording II. Students will formulate, design, and complete individualized projects using AVID ProTools software in a live recording studio environment. Students’ course projects will incorporate advanced recording, mixing, mastering, compression, and microphone techniques. 
PR: MUS 179, Acceptance into A.A.S. Music Audio Technology program. 
PR/CR: MUS 151

MUS 280 (1-6-3) - Audio Recording Field Experience

This course provides students with a structured practical experience in a professional music business environment. The experience may be in audio recording, live sound, music management, or live music production, according to students’ interests. The course requires a minimum of 90 hours of supervised field experience and fifteen hours of classroom instruction. This course also provides preparation for Avid Pro Tools 110 User Certification. 
PR: MUS 152, MUS 278, Minimum 2.5 GPA, Minimum 30 hours completed towards degree, Permission of the Instructor or Dean

MUS 283 (3-2-3) - Music in Contemporary Education

This course provides an overview of the professional world of music education. The course covers processes of learning; goals and objectives; bases for selection of strategies, materials and functional techniques; and evaluative considerations within a consistent philosophical rationale related to contemporary education environments. In-class peer teaching opportunities on campus, and thirty clock-hours of supervised observations in local public schools are an integral part of this course. Professional development workshops in music education that are approved by the instructor may also apply to the required thirty clock-hours.
PR: MUS 152 and MUS 156

MUS 284 (3-0-3) - Music in Contemporary Education II

This course provides an overview of current methods, materials, and practices in secondary school music instruction. The course covers all aspects of teaching music at the secondary school level, with emphasis on active learning that engages students and involves them directly in the learning process. Particular attention is given to the developmental needs and interests of secondary school students. In-class peer teaching opportunities on campus, and thirty clock-hours of supervised observations in local public schools are an integral part of this course. Professional development workshops in music education that are approved by the instructor may also apply to the required thirty clock-hours.
PR: MUS 152 and MUS 156

MUS 285 (2-0-2) - Brass Techniques

This course familiarizes music students with the fundamentals of brass instruments and pedagogy. Topics and activities include the development of intermediate performance skills on trumpet and trombone and the discussion and demonstration of horn, tuba, and euphonium. This course also focuses on pedagogical approaches for beginning students, basic maintenance of instruments, and instrument accessories. 
PR: MUS 152 and MUS 156 Fall only

MUS 286 (2-0-2) - Woodwind Techniques

This course familiarizes music students with the fundamentals of woodwind instruments and pedagogy. Topics and activities include the development of intermediate performance skills on flute, clarinet, and saxophone and the discussion and demonstration of oboe and bassoon. This course also focuses on pedagogical approaches for beginning students, basic maintenance of instruments, and instrument accessories. 
PR: MUS 152 and MUS 156 Spring only

MUS 287 (1-0-1) - Keyboard Techniques I

This course introduces functional keyboard skills including harmonization, accompaniment styles, improvisation, and analysis. Activities include performance of single line melodies with accompaniment and basic piano repertoire, and exercises in harmonic progressions, scales, and transpositions. This course also emphasizes reading of single and multi-stave scores. 
PR: Acceptance into A.S. or A.A.S. music program.

MUS 288 (1-0-1) - Keyboard Techniques II

This course continues the development of functional keyboard skills introduced in MUS 287 including harmonization and accompaniment in various styles, improvisation, transposition, and pedagogy. Students harmonize melodies using primary and auxiliary diatonic chords, and secondary (applied) dominants. Course activities include performing intermediate level piano repertoire, multi-stave score reading, 17th century-style figured bass exercises, scales, and harmonic progressions. 
PR: MUS 287

MUS 289 (1-0-1) - Keyboard Techniques III

This course reinforces and further develops functional keyboard skills introduced and developed in MUS 287 and 288. Students harmonize melodies that emphasize chromatic harmonies including secondary (applied) dominant and leading tone chords, as well as melodies that modulate. Students also focus on more advanced piano repertoire that contains elements of chromatic harmony including borrowed chords, augmented sixth chords and Neapolitan chords. Course activities also include performing vocal accompaniments, multi-stave score reading, 17th century-style figured bass exercises, scales, and harmonic progressions. 
PR: MUS 288

NMT 150 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Materials Science

This course is a general introduction to the study of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. This course investigates the relationship between bonding, structure (crystals and microstructure) and properties of these materials. The course examines elementary principles of thermodynamics as they apply to materials, mechanical properties of materials, and the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials.

NMT 152 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Nanoscale Materials

This course introduces students to the field of nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials have chemical and physical properties that are significantly different from those of bulk materials. This course examines the underlying principles of the resulting size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course will cover the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale materials based on top-down and bottom-up approaches. The applications of nanodevices made from nanoscale materials will also be discussed. 
PR: NMT 150 PR/CR: MAT 118, MAT 154 or higher Spring only

NTR 161 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Human Nutrition

This course is designed to explain the role of nutrition in health maintenance. Food sources, functions, and interrelationships of the six major nutrient categories are discussed as well as energy requirements and balance. The principles of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle are applied to nutritional assessment, menu planning and designing a healthy diet.

PAL 111 (3-0-3) - Survey of American Law

This course is an introduction to the law and legal system of the United States and the individual states. It first examines the roles of the participants from lawmakers and judges to attorneys, legal assistants and litigants. Students discuss ethical considerations for these parties. Students analyze sources of law and the part played by each branch of government in producing law. Students examine broad areas of substantive law relating to contracts, torts, crimes, property and personal rights with the focus on constitutional, statutory and common law developments in these areas. F,S

PAL 112 (3-0-3) - Legal Research

This course is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to accurately and efficiently research virtually any topic in the law. In addition to providing a background for understanding the tools used, students are taught the fundamental techniques of how to find applicable legal principles and authority among primary and secondary sources of law. Methods for updating the law, through the use of Shepard’s Citations and other tools, are presented so that the legal research product will be accurate and timely. 
PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL 114 (3-0-3) - Courts and Litigation

This course surveys New York and federal courts and jurisdiction, and focuses on procedure, concentrating on New York civil practice. Studies in legal research are continued with emphasis placed on the preparation of forms, briefs, affidavits and pleadings. 
PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL 217 (3-0-3) - Estates and Trusts

This course is a study of the substantive and procedural laws of estates, trusts, guardianships, fiduciaries, and estate taxation. 
PR: PAL 111, PAL 112 F

PAL 219 (3-0-3) - Real Property

This course introduces the law of real property and terminology of real estate interests and conveyances. Real property instruments are defined and examined, including the different types and nature of contracts, deeds, mortgages and leases. Acquisition and loss of real property interests by means other than deeds (such as adverse possession, prescription and inheritance) are also examined. Students prepare an abstract of title by examining recorded instruments. 
PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL 231 (3-0-3) - Family Law

This course is a study of the law of domestic relations and family law. This includes the substantive laws of marriage, adoption, divorce, annulment, separation, family obligations, children’s rights and procedural laws concerning Family Court proceedings. Also included will be experience in the drafting of documents and instruments related to the aforesaid subjects. 
PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL 233 (3-0-3) - Administrative Law

This course is a study of the nature and sources of administrative law, special problems relating thereto and the place of administrative action in our governmental and legal systems. 
PR: PAL 111 and 112 F,S

PAL 250 (0-0-3) - Paralegal Internship

This course provides the opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to the paralegal profession. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced while working in a supervised professional setting. The field study will incorporate paralegal or law-related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by scheduled meetings with the instructor. The course requires completion of 120 hours of field work. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. 
PR: Paralegal major, completion of 30 credit hours, completion of PAL 112 and PAL 114, minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of the Division.

PHI 141 (3-0-3) - Survey of Major Western Philosophers

This course provides an introductory survey of the major trends and developments in Western philosophical thought- particularly in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, theology, aesthetics, and political philosophy-from the ancient Greeks to the 20th century. By adopting a historical perspective, the course traces that development through the contributions of major representative thinkers and movements. The course encourages students to examine their own philosophical positions or beliefs.

PHI 143 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Philosophical Problems

Focusing on issues in epistemology, ontology, philosophy of religion, philosophy of freedom, ethics, political and social philosophy, and philosophy of art, this course introduces students to important questions that have preoccupied Western philosophers and to representative attempts by those philosophers to answer those questions. The course will also consider significant contributions to the discussion of those questions by experts from other fields, such as physics and biology. The course encourages students to examine their own philosophical position or beliefs.

PHY 106 (3-0-3) - Meteorology

This course covers the fundamental concepts of meteorology including meteorological instruments and observation, synoptic chart interpretation, air masses, fronts, fog formation and dissipation, and severe weather. Also covered are weather reporting and forecasting and the dissemination of meteorological information for pilots and flight operations personnel. Students will be required to access and utilize the Internet to review and formulate web-based weather strategies. Spring only 

PHY 120 (3-0-3) - Physical Science I

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. This course covers the fundamentals of physics and space science; topics include the concepts of force, motion, energy, electricity, light, formation of the solar system, lifecycle of stars and classification of galaxies. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical sciences in interpreting the world around us. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. The two courses need not be taken in sequence. 
PR: Eligible to enroll in 100-level math course

PHY 121 (3-0-3) - Physical Science II

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. This course covers the fundamentals of chemistry and earth science; topics include the atomic nature of matter, states of matter, changes of state, chemical reactions, the rock cycle, how chemical elements are cycled, the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical sciences in interpreting the world around us. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. The two courses need not be taken in sequence. 
PR: Eligible to enroll in 100-level math course

PHY 153 (3-3-4) - Physics I

This course uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe forces, kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws. The following topics are covered: translation motion, torque, friction, projectile motion, momentum, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound and thermodynamics. Vector algebra will be used extensively.  
PR: MAT 118, MAT 148 or eligible to enroll in MAT 167 

PHY 154 (3-3-4) - Physics II

This course uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe fluids, electricity, magnetism and optics. The following topics are covered: electric force and field, potential, capacitance, current, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic force and fields, AC circuits, reflection, refraction, mirror lenses and gratings. 
PR: MAT 118, MAT 154 or higher, or eligible to enroll in MAT 167 Spring only

PHY 221 (3-3-4) - College Physics I

This course is the first part of a one-year sequence. This course uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws. The following topics are covered: force, friction, translational and rotational motion, torque, and periodic motion. PR/CR: MAT 180 Fall only

PHY 222 (3-3-4) - College Physics II

The course is the second part of a one-year sequence. This course uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe electricity, magnetism, induction, and optics. The following topics are covered: electric force and field, Gauss’s Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current, resistance and EMF, DC circuits, magnetic force and field, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, geometric optics and wave optics. PR/CR: MAT 181 
PR: PHY 221 Spring only 

POL 123 (3-0-3) - United States Government and Politics

This course introduces students to the institutions, structures, and processes of the United States federal government. It examines political theories; the Constitution; federalism; the three branches of government and the federal bureaucracy; political parties and elections; civil liberties and civil rights; the role of the media, interest groups, and social movements; and the interrelationship of economic and political power.

PSY 121 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Psychology

This course introduces major theories and concepts in contemporary psychology. Topics covered include biopsychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory, thinking and intelligence, lifespan, consciousness, motivation and emotion, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders, health psychology, sex, gender, and sexuality. The course introduces students to scientific methods related to psychological research.

PSY 155 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Special Education

This course is an introduction to the education of exceptional children from birth to age twenty-one. It explores characteristics of various exceptionalities, as well as laws, policies, and procedures affecting students with special needs. The course emphasizes the identification of quality learning environments that ensure the inclusion of every child, and it identifies current practices, methods, and strategies for teaching children with diverse learning and developmental needs. A ten-hour field experience is included to enable students to connect course content to an environment serving individuals with special needs.

PSY 200 (3-0-3) - Statistics for Social Sciences

This course introduces students to the application of statistical methods in the social sciences for the purpose of experimentation. The course provides an overview of how descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, estimation, confidence intervals and various methods of hypothesis testing such as ANOVA and Chi-square, are used in research. 
PR: SOC 121 or PSY 121 and eligible to enroll in a 100-level math course Fall only

PSY 221 (3-0-3) - Educational Psychology

This course provides students with an introduction to research-based concepts and principles about human learning, development and motivation and how that information is applied to classroom teaching. Emphasis is placed on learning theory and design of instruction through identification of learning outcomes, effective teaching strategies and assessment procedures. The role and methods of service learning are explored and applied through classroom instruction and the development of a service learning plan. 
PR: PSY 121

PSY 222 (3-0-3) - Lifespan Development

This course provides a broad overview of human development from the lifespan perspective (prenatal development through the stages of aging). The major domains of development including physical, cognitive, emotional and social development are identified with an emphasis on the joint contribution of both biology and environment. The course provides students with the opportunity to examine major theoretical perspectives and explore the impact of culture, and context on development. 
PR: PSY 121

PSY 223 (3-0-3) - Adolescent Psychology

Students will study human development from puberty to young adulthood. They will examine the adolescent in terms of biological, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. Normal development will be emphasized, but special issues will be investigated. The impact of cultural factors will be explored. 
PR: PSY 121 S

PSY 224 (3-0-3) - Abnormal Psychology

This course introduces a variety of mental disorders as recognized by the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The course emphasizes the biological, psychological and sociocultural approaches to the study of abnormal psychology, as well as the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment process. The course examines the impact historical, ethical, and research implications have on the diagnostic and treatment process. 
PR: PSY 121

PSY 225 (3-2-4) - Introduction to Special Education

This course is an introduction to the education of exceptional children. Characteristics of the various exceptionalities as well as laws, policies, and procedures affecting students with special needs are explored. Emphasis is placed on identifying quality learning environments that ensure the inclusion of every child, and current practices for teaching children with diverse learning and developmental needs. The methods and strategies for teaching and including children with special needs are discussed and applied. Students observe 30 hours in an environment serving children with special needs.

PSY 226 (3-0-3) - Social Psychology

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theoretical concepts in the study of social psychology. It will examine the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations with emphasis on how social behavior is shaped by culture, evolution, personal construal, and situational variables. Topics covered include research methods, the nature of the social self, social judgments and attitudes, emotion, social relationships, stereotyping and prejudice, altruism, and social behavior in groups. 
PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

PSY 227 (3-0-3) - Psych of Disabilities

This course provides an overview of disabilities including the historical and social context and the nature and needs of disabled individuals throughout the life cycle. It presents a variety of theoretical frameworks to help understand the definitions, causes, and etiology of a variety of disabilities. The course focuses on best practice assessment and treatment methods employed to effectively address and meet the needs of individuals with disabilities and their families. 
PR: PSY 121

PSY 230 (4-0-4) - Child Development

This course is a study into the principles of child growth and development from conception to adolescence. The course content will focus on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains of development. The student will be required to observe the development of a child outside the classroom in order to complete a comprehensive child study project. In order to complete this major project, 10-20 hours of outside observation are required.

PSY 240 (3-0-3) - Human Sexuality

This course is an introductory overview of the field of human sexuality. Human sexuality will be examined from psychological, biological, sociocultural and historical perspectives. Students will be encouraged to become aware of their own sexual attitudes, values, and behaviors and to evaluate the consistency of their behaviors within their own moral frameworks. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate about sexuality with a greater degree of effectiveness and personal comfort. 
PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

REL 121 (3-0-3) - World Religions

This course introduces students to the major religions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course explores each religion’s history, beliefs, and practices, and its contemporary context. The course pays particular attention to the differences among the religions, the similarities among them, and the ways in which they interact with each other.

SCI 111 (3-0-3) - Food Science

This course introduces the scientific fundamentals of food and cooking. It examines doughs and batters, dairy products and eggs, meats, fruits and vegetables, sauces, chocolate and confections, and food additives. Students learn the scientific principles behind the various cooking methods and techniques that transform these foods.

SCI 115 (3-3-4) - The Science of Brewing and Distilling

This course introduces the scientific fundamentals of brewing and distilling. Students learn the scientific principles behind the treatment of water, the milling and mashing of grains, the addition of hops, fermentation, and carbonation and how these processes affect the various characteristics of beer. Students also learn the scientific principles of spirit distillation and the flavor development of various spirits. The laboratory focuses on the techniques and analyses utilized in the brewing and distilling industries.

SOC 121 (3-0-3) - Sociology

This course introduces students to the basic patterns of social behavior and the structure and functions of social organizations. It emphasizes research methodology, culture and cultural change, socialization and deviance, population and social stratification, and social institutions. This course is a service learning course.

SOC 122 (3-0-3) - Social Problems

This course provides a sociological orientation to the study of social problems, and the analysis of several contemporary issues. The topics selected may include, but are not limited to: addiction, crime, ecology, education, medical care, poverty, prejudice, discrimination, social sexual issues, urban issues, and research methodology. This course is a service learning course.

SOC 125 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

This course focuses on the theoretical, philosophical, historical and ethical dimensions of the social work profession in the United States. It introduces students to core social work theories and skills and to the best practices associated with them. This course presents current theories and issues in social work affecting local, state and national social programs, agencies, and individuals. F,S

SOC 127 (3-0-3) - Interpersonal and Group Dynamics

This course introduces students to interpersonal and group communication skills as they apply to human services settings. The course content is reinforced by a required service learning project.

SOC 200 (3-0-3) - Statistics for Social Sciences

This course introduces students to the application of statistical methods in the social sciences for the purpose of experimentation. The course provides an overview of how descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, estimation, confidence intervals and various methods of hypothesis testing such as ANOVA and Chi-square, are used in research. 
PR: SOC 121 or PSY 121, and eligible to enroll in a 100-level math course

SOC 222 (3-0-3) - Sociology of the Family

This course focuses on family dynamics in the United States in historical and cross-cultural context. It examines family structure, organization, dissolution, and services, as well as internal and external influences, and marital and nonmarital relationships. 
PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122 

SOC 224 (3-0-3) - Sociology of Aging

This course examines aging on both the individual and societal levels. Psychological and physiological aspects of aging are discussed as well as social policy in light of how they may affect quality of life for the elderly. 
PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122

SOC 228 (3-0-3) - Minority Groups

This course covers past, current, and possible trends in minority versus majority group relations in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon dominate versus subordinate racial and/or ethnic groups. In addition, other subordinate groups such as those identified by gender, sexual orientation, or disability will be discussed. The nature of prejudice and discrimination are also discussed as well as strategies to reduce them. 
PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122

SOC 230 (3-0-3) - Introduction to Sociological Theory

The course focuses on the theories of Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and George Mead. The course also examines contributions of the above theorists and their followers and critics on the development of contemporary sociological theory. Theory construction and value neutrality are additional subjects. 
PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122

SOC 232 (3-0-3) - Social Deviance

This course explores various aspects of social deviance within society. Context and socio-cultural variables will be examined in determining cause, impact, and consequence of deviant behavior. Theories of deviance and selected areas of deviant behavior such as: genocide, suicide, cyberspace, terrorism, addiction, and sex are discussed and evaluated. 
PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

SPA 115 (3-0-3) - Conversational Spanish I

This is a beginning course in Spanish which emphasizes oral communication in a variety of topics at a basic level. It covers only that grammar and structure absolutely necessary for speaking. The course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of the Spanish language. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. F,S

SPA 121 (3-0-3) - Elementary Spanish I

Elementary Spanish I provides an introduction to the Spanish language for students with no previous Spanish studies or one year of high school Spanish. It develops elementary grammar, syntax, and written and oral communication skills. This course examines a variety of Hispanic cultures throughout the world. This course requires the completion of a minimum of five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

SPA 122 (3-0-3) - Elementary Spanish II

Elementary Spanish II is for students who have completed SPA 121 or two years of high school Spanish. This course concludes elementary-level grammar studies, further develops syntax and communication skills, and examines a variety of Hispanic cultures throughout the world. This course requires the completion of a minimum of five documented hours of lab work outside of class. 
PR: SPA 121 or two years of high school Spanish

SPA 222 (3-0-3) - Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate Spanish I is for students who have completed SPA 122 or three years of high school Spanish. This course reinforces and further develops grammar, syntax, and communication skills and examines a variety of Hispanic cultures throughout the world. This course requires the completion of a minimum of five documented hours of lab work outside of class. 
PR: SPA 122 or three years of high school Spanish

SPA 224 (3-0-3) - Intermediate Spanish II

Intermediate Spanish II is for students who have completed SPA 222 or four years of high school Spanish. This course reinforces and further develops intermediate-level grammar, syntax, and communication skills. It also examines a variety of Hispanic cultures, political events, and social experiences. This course requires the completion of a minimum of five documented hours of lab work outside of class.
PR: SPA 222 or 4 years of high school Spanish

SSA 201 (0-0-3) - Italian Food & Culture

This course provides the opportunity to study the cuisine and culture of three distinct regions of Italy including Lazio, Emilia Romagna, and Piemonte. The focus will be on studying and working with many of the key ingredients that make the Italian cuisine known worldwide. Included among these ingredients are wines, charcuterie, breads, cheese, pasta, and other regional specialties. This will be accomplished through a 17 day trip to Italy highlighted by lecture and hands-on instruction from culinary professionals in the various sectors of culinary production including vintners, farmers, producers of cheese, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and cured meats, and chefs. 

TET 221 (3-0-3) - Foundations of Education

This course provides preservice teachers with an introduction to the social, cultural, philosophical, political, legal, and historical context of B-12 education in the United States. Preservice teachers critically examine key issues in education and pedagogical theory as well as current trends in teaching and learning. This course provides an introduction to applying New York State teaching standards, reading and writing objectives, assessing learning, and formulating lesson plans. Attendance at one School Board meeting (typically an evening commitment) and observations in the field are required.

TET 252 (1-0-1) - Pre-professional Seminar

This capstone Seminar is intended for TET majors who are about to graduate and transfer to senior institutions. Observations and course work are used to review and analyze knowledge and skills that have been acquired throughout coursework. Opportunities are provided for students to acquire additional supervised observation hours. A pre-professional portfolio serves as a summative experience. 
PR: Permission of the division Spring only

TEL 221 (3-0-3) - Data Communications

This course is an introduction to the concepts and systems of modern communications and provides a solid foundation in the technology of the field. Topics to be covered include system equipment components and their performance capabilities, carriers and their services, data networks, data link controls, and legislation/regulations pertinent to data communications. 
PR: TEL 121 S